2022 Photography Assignment Winners


We had so many incredible submissions to our weekly assignments last year. With seasonal themes to those focusing on composition and technique, our weekly assignments were created to inspire photographers, and we hope you gained inspiration and new skills over the year.

The gallery below features the winning image from each assignment in 2022. Check it out for inspiration, and then get ready to enter our assignments in 2023!

The winning images from our weekly assignments are featured on the OP Blog, as well as our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages.

2022 Photography Assignment Winners

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Y/OUR Denver Photography highlights city in flux


Even though many of us see the Denver skyline daily, there are all kinds of new perspectives and little touches that we may never notice. But the Y/OUR Denver 2022 photography exhibit, the fifth annual collaboration between Denver Architecture Foundation and Colorado Photographic Arts Center, aims to provide viewers the chance to get a new look on architecture and design around the state.

The digital exhibition is online through Feb. 28, and features the winning photographs from the Doors Open Denver photography competition, which offered artists a larger group of subjects than ever before.

“This year, we opened up the photo contest and exhibition to images of Colorado architecture, not just Denver architecture,” wrote Pauline Marie Herrera, president and CEO of the Denver Architecture Foundation, in an email interview. “I’ve enjoyed seeing the striking photos of architectural sites from around our state.”

According to provided information, participating photographers of all skill levels were invited to find and photograph their favorite architectural spaces in Denver and throughout the state. All forms of architectural imagery were eligible: black and white, color, exterior, interior and detail images.

“It’s interesting to see the types of architecture that makes up the different neighborhoods and houses and just how varied our architecture is,” said Samantha Johnston, executive director and curator of CPAC and juror for the competition. “It’s so exciting for me to see how photographers capture spaces we think about all the time.”

Of the 233 entries, Johnston selected 30 finalist images, including the following for four winners:

Best in Show: “Justice Center Dome” by Ernie Leyba

Best Exterior: “Breaking a Bridge” by Mark Stein

Best Interior: “Williams Tower” by Lauren Sherman-Boemker

Best Detail: “Camouflage” by Carol Mikesh

“I hope people who see the exhibit come away with an appreciation of Denver’s (and Colorado’s) architecture and a desire to explore it,” Herrera wrote. “I also hope they understand what it means to our quality of life and its importance to our future.”

Since she has served as juror for the last five years, Johnston has learned that seeing the many wonderful photographs people submit can make any day out in Denver a kind of adventure — one that more people can participate in.

“When you walk around the city, you can look up and say, ‘Oh, that’s where they took that shot,’” she said. “It gives people an appreciation for things they maybe haven’t seen and an appreciation for the city changing.”

See the photographs in the exhibition at https://denverarchitecture.org.

 

The hills are alive at PACE with ‘Sound of Music’

Even if you don’t like musicals, there are some that have just been so thoroughly embraced by the culture that you can’t get away from them. “The Sound of Music” might be at the very top of that list – it’s immortal. For longtime fans and newbies, the Parker Arts, Culture, and Events (PACE) Center has brought the story of Maria Augusta Trapp and the von Trapp family to the stage this winter.

The musical runs at PACE, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., through Feb. 4. The final collaboration between Rogers and Hammerstein, come see classics like “My Favorite Things” and “Sixteen Going on Seventeen.” For information and tickets, visit parkerarts.org/event/the-sound-of-music/.

 

LSO hosts annual family concert

“Babar the Elephant” is one of the stories that really connected with me when I was growing up. Originally by Jean de Brunhoff, the popular 1938 children’s book is based on a story that his wife Cecille told to their children. French composer Francis Poulenc wrote a musical composition that follows Babar as he moves to the city and all the adventures he has in his new home.

For the Lakewood Symphony Orchestra’s annual family concert, the group will perform Poulenc’s music at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway. As is tradition, conductor Matthew Switzer will begin by teaching the children a bit about the world of music.

Get tickets for this great concert at www.lakewoodsymphony.org.

 

Clarke’s Concert of the Week — Sun June at Why Bonnie at the Hi-Dive

You gotta love some indie rock this time of year – albums that are drenched in guitar reverb and swirling vocals can just wrap you up during the cold winter months. Two wonderful examples of what the genre can be are both from Austin, Texas: Sun June and Why Bonnie. Sun June’s 2021 album, “Somewhere,” and Why Bonnie’s 2022 release, “90 In November,” both were among my favorite releases of their respective years and really hit their target vibes.

 

Both bands will be stopping by the Hi-Dive, 7 S. Broadway in Denver, along with Porlolo at 9 p.m. Jan. 28. The Hi-Dive is a great venue for this kind of music, so take the opportunity to send off January and get tickets at https://hi-dive.com/.

 

Clarke Reader’s column on culture appears on a weekly basis. He can be reached at Clarke.Reader@hotmail.com.



Tyre Nichols was a son and father who enjoyed skateboarding, photography and sunsets, his family says




CNN
 — 

Tyre Nichols was a father, a man who loved his mama and a free-spirited soul who was looking for a new life in Memphis, Tennessee.

That life was tragically cut short earlier this month after a violent arrest by five officers with the Memphis Police.

Now, as attention turns to the five former officers being charged with second-degree murder in Nichols’ death, according to court documents, Nichols’ family wants the world to know the man Nichols was.

The 29-year-old was the baby of his family, the youngest of four children. He was a “good boy” who spent his Sundays doing laundry and getting ready for the week, his mother, Ravaughn Wells, said.

“Does that sound like somebody that the police said did all these bad things?” Wells said. “Nobody’s perfect OK, but he was damn near.”

“I know everybody says that they had a good son, and everybody’s son is good, but my son, he actually was a good boy,” she said.

Above all else, Nichols loved being a father and loved his son, his family said.

“Everything he was trying to do was to better himself as a father for his 4-year-old son,” attorney Benjamin Crump said at the family’s news conference.

Nichols was someone who brought everyone joy. “When he comes through the door, he wants to give you a hug,” Crump said, speaking on behalf of Nichols’ family.

Nichols moved to Memphis right before the Covid-19 pandemic and got stuck there when things shut down, his mother said. “But he was OK with it because he loved his mother,” she added.

His mom said he loved her “to death” – so much so that he inked it permanently.

“He had my name tattooed on his arm, and that made me proud because most kids don’t put their mom’s name, but he did,” Wells said with a laugh.

“My son was a beautiful soul and he touched everyone,” she said.

Nichols became friends with an unlikely group of people because they kept showing up to the same Starbucks around the same time in the morning, his friend Nate Spates Jr. said.

A couple times a week, these five or six friends would sit together, put their phones away so they could be present and enjoy each other’s company, said Spates, who met Nichols about a year ago at a Starbucks in Germantown, Tennessee.

The group didn’t talk much about their personal lives, and they never touched politics. But sports, particularly football, and Nichols’ favorite team, the San Francisco 49ers, were regular topics.

Nichols was a “free spirited person, a gentleman who marched to the beat of his own drum,” Spates told CNN. “He liked what he liked. If you liked what he liked – fine. If you didn’t – fine.”

Spates said he saw himself in Nichols and recognized a young man who was trying to find his own way and learning to believe in himself.

He saw Nichols grow and start to believe he could do whatever “he set out to do in this world,” Spates said.

Spates’ favorite memory of Ty, as he called Nichols, was last year on Spates’ birthday, when Nichols met Spates’ wife and 3-year-old at their usual Starbucks. He watched Nichols play with his toddler and talk to his wife with kindness.

“When we left, my wife said, ‘I just really like his soul. He’s got such a good spirit,’” Spates said.

“To speak about someone’s soul is very deep,” he said. “I’ll never forget when she said that. I’ll always remember that about him.”

Spates joins the rest of Nichols’ family and wider Memphis community in being frustrated at the lack of information that has come out about the traffic stop that resulted in Nichols’ death. He said he’s had to do a lot of compartmentalizing to be able to even speak about his friend.

“I just hope that this truly does open up honest dialogue, and not dialogue until the next one happens, but a dialogue for change,” he said.

Nichols’ daily life was ordinary at times, as he worked and spent time with family, but he also made time for his passions, his mom, Wells, said.

After his Starbucks sessions, he would come home and take a nap before heading to work, said Wells, with whom he was living. Nichols worked the second shift at FedEx, where he had been employed for about nine months, she said.

He came home during his break to eat with his mom, who would have dinner cooked.

Nichols loved his mom’s homemade chicken, made with sesame seeds, just the way he liked it, Wells said.

When he wasn’t working, Nichols headed to Shelby Farms Park to skateboard, something he had been doing since he was 6 years old. He would wake up on Saturdays to go skate or sometimes, he’d go to the park to enjoy the sunset and snap photos of it, his mom said.

“My son every night wanted to go and look at the sunset, that was his passion.”

Photography was a form of self-expression that writing could never capture for Nichols, who wrote that it helped him look “at the world in a more creative way,” on his photography website.

While he snapped everything from action shots of sports to bodies of water, landscape photography was his favorite, he wrote.

“I hope to one day let people see what i see and to hopefully admire my work based on the quality and ideals of my work,” he wrote. He signed the post: “Your friend, – Tyre D. Nichols.”

Skating was another way Nichols showed the world his personality. A video montage of Nichols on YouTube shows his face up close with the sun shining behind him before he coasts up and down a ramp on his skateboard. He grinds the rail and does tricks on his board in the video, which was shown at a news conference by his family’s attorney Crump.

Sunsets, skateboarding and his positive nature were all things that Nichols was known for, longtime friend Angelina Paxton told The Commercial Appeal, a local paper.

Skating was a big part of his life in Sacramento, California, where he lived before he moved to Memphis, Paxton said.

“He was his own person and didn’t care if he didn’t fit into what a traditional Black man was supposed to be in California. He had such a free spirit and skating gave him his wings,” Paxton said.

Paxton and Nichols met when they were 11 years old and attending a youth group, she told the Appeal.

“Tyre was someone who knew everyone, and everyone had a positive image of him because that’s who he was,” Paxton said. “Every church knew him; every youth group knew him.”

When Paxton found out about Nichols’ death, she crumbled, she told CNN affiliate WMC.

“My knees gave out,” she told WMC. “I just fell because I could not believe that someone with such light was taken out in such a dark way.”

Paxton attended Nichols’ memorial service earlier this month in Memphis. She said she represented the people in California who knew him and wanted to support his family.

“There would be a couple thousand people in this room,” Paxton told WMC, if the memorial had been in Sacramento. “He was such an innocent person. He was such a light. This could have been any of us.”

For his family, seeing the turnout and feeling the outpouring of support meant a lot.

Nichols’ stepfather Rodney Wells told WMC: “My son is a community person, so this (memorial) was good to see.”



OUR HOMETOWN: Williams Lake photographer strives to capture moments, record history


A visual storyteller from the time she was a teenager, Laureen Carruthers has been a professional photographer in Williams Lake for over 15 years.

Her love for photography began after she saw an enlarged photograph her high school art teacher, David Abbott, had taken of his daughters, which included Carruthers’ lifelong friend, Kelly Abbott. She recalled looking up at that photo and instantly knowing that she wanted to take photos of her own children like that one day.

Now, she photographs just about everything, from intimate portraits of mothers with their newly born babes to action-packed rodeo photos. Her photos are warm and authentic, capturing precious moments that might otherwise be forgotten.

When looking at her work, it’s as if you’ve walked into a memory and are now truly there. You can hear the rushing water as a fisherman carefully stabilizes himself against jagged rocks while holding out a net of fish. You feel the wind from the bride’s dress as her groom whisks her into the air.

Time stands still in a photograph, yet in her work, you see an entire story unfolding.

Carruthers is drawn to what’s real, and she “[tries] to capture that no matter what genre [she is] photographing.”

While she could never pick a favourite moment as a photographer, she cherishes being able to photograph children, like the photos of her own boys with her father who has since passed. Encapsulating moments like that is something she’ll never forget.

Carruthers opened her photo studio around 2012 after outgrowing her basement, where she was photographing families and newborns. Her studio allowed her more space, far superior lighting and the ability to grow her business into commercial work as well.

Outside of her studio, she’s built special connections with the Tsilhqot’in National Government, where she works for them on a contract basis. She loves all she’s learned about the First Nations culture and traditions, including “how the elders are treasured” and being able to photograph them, with “their faces [having] so much to tell.”

She also volunteers some of her time, where annually she photographs the Williams Lake Stampede and more recently the Williams Lake Stampeders hockey team. She was drawn to sports photography after her boys got into things like mountain biking and soccer. Some of her volunteer work is much harder but leaves bereaved parents with truly invaluable keepsakes – photos of their adored stillborn babies. Carruthers said, “this one is really hard to do, but I feel is so very important,” including trying to capture precious moments between family members who are in the process of losing a loved one.

“I want to take photos that will matter in years to come, be it for families, maybe history lessons… Things that will make a difference in people’s lives.”

As for the future, Carruthers said she will always continue to learn and would love to do more travel photography, allowing her to see and learn about more cultures. She believes that “life imitates art” and that “all of [her] work is because of who [she is] and how [she sees] things in the world. [Her] photos are just an extension of things [she sees and feels].”

Along with her high school art teacher, David Abbott, some of her influences include Sue Bryce, whom she saw in Seattle after she won a trip to see her, and Annie Leibovitz, whose lighting and art direction she studies. She’s also inspired by old movies and paintings.

As for her own advice for aspiring photographers, she encourages them to learn everything they can about light, and not to simply rely on Photoshop. Photography means “drawing with light,” and “knowing light is by far the most important element of a good photo,” Carruthers said.

While camera-shy herself, Carruthers encourages people to get photos of themselves taken because “they are the only keepsakes we have of moments that will never again happen. They are history… We all matter. We are all a story that needs to be told and remembered.”

Her work has been published many times. One of the highlights of her career was when she won a Canada-wide photo contest through Getty Images. She was flown out to Toronto where she accepted her award.

In her personal life, Laureen and her partner Joel Gyselinck, who also works as her second shooter at weddings, enjoy living on an acreage on the outskirts of the city. Their hobbies include gardening and caring for their growing mix of animals including chickens, miniature donkeys, a pony, a horse, one goose, a cat and their basset hounds.

Recently, she was nominated by an anonymous community member for a BC Small Business Award, which she says “is truly an honour. Receiving letters of support over the last few days has moved me to tears and really helped me realize just how much my work matters in people’s lives, and I honestly feel like this is enough. Winning would be awesome, but feeling the love and appreciation I have over this last week is really enough.”

While she would love to have less social media in her life, social media is a helpful avenue in her receiving business and sharing her work. Her website is www.laureencarruthersphotography.com. You can also find her on Instagram and Facebook by searching Laureen Carruthers Photography.


Do you have a comment about this story? email:
editor@wltribune.com
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CaribooPhotographyWilliams Lake

 

Laureen Carruthers photography

Laureen Carruthers photography

Laureen Carruthers photography

Laureen Carruthers photography

Laureen Carruthers photography



Gilavar Photo Club whips up interest in keen photographers [PHOTO]


Through its multifaceted activities, the Gilavar Photo Club
successfully contributes to the country’s photography art.

Founded in 2017, the Gilavar Photo Club aims at discovering and
supporting talented photographers.

The club’s participants are actively engaged in local and
international photo contests. Since 2017, the photo club has been a
member of the International Association of Art Photographers. In
2020, the Gilavar Photo Club became Azerbaijan’s official
representative at the association.

2023 marks the fifth anniversary of the photo club that promotes
photography art in the country and beyond its borders.

On this occasion, the Gilavar Photo Club awarded some of the
best photographers in the “Stills 2022” competition.

The awarding ceremony took place at the Baku Youth Center and
brought together many officials, photographers, press secretaries,
and mass media representatives.

Chairman of the Gilavar Photo Club Board of Directors Rashad
Mehdiyev addressed the event. In his speech, he listed a number of
projects implemented by the photo club over the past years.

Over this time, the photo club organized over 10 international
photo contests with the special permission of the International
Federation of Photographic Art, Photographic Society of America
(PSA),

At the same time, over 4,000 photographers from about 80
countries participated in international photo contests organized by
the club.

Mehdiyev noted that for the first time, the club launched a
competition called “Azerbaijan Press Photo” – “Press Photo of the
Year” in the field of photojournalism.

Founder of the Gilavar Photo Club Dilavar Najafov and the
Gilavar Photo Club Board of Directors Rashad Mehdiyev spoke about
the photo club’s main objectives.

Gilavar Photo Club’s main goals include the search for talented
photographers and photography art development in the country.

The photo club supports the participation of photographers in
international photo contests and arouses interest in anyone keen on
photography.

Next, the Gilavar Photo Club awarded Azerbaijani photographers,
who distinguished themselves in international competitions as well
as the winners of “Photo shoots 2022” and “Azerbaijan Press Photo”
competitions.

Furthermore, the guests of the ceremony viewed a photo
exhibition held as part of the event.

Follow us on Twitter @AzerNewsAz



Spanish Artist Carlos Cabo Creates Amazing Abstract Figurative Ceramic Sculptures




Spanish artist Carlos Cabo creates elegant and amazing abstract figurative ceramic sculptures. Clay is incredibly malleable and versatile, allowing artists to mold the material into a wide array of forms. Carlos masters in clay art and he creates figure sculptures out of clay that reinterpret the human anatomy and forms of sea creatures in an abstract way.

In his words “I grew up in a rural environment, in which we children spent a lot of time outdoors, in permanent contact with endless objects that served to accumulate a lot of tactile experiences in my memory. On the other hand, in my town, there was no electricity during the day. This came to the houses when it got dark and, sometimes, well into the night, which forced us to wander around it using our sense of feeling and touch… I came to know all the imperfections of the walls, the geometry of the doors, and the location of things.”

Scroll down and inspire yourself. Check Carlos Cabo’s Website and Instagram for more information.

You can find more info about Carlos Cabo:

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The top 10 entry-level photography cameras


The perfect entry-level camera

Many people are passionate about photography, and it’s a great hobby to pick up if you’re looking for a creative outlet. However, getting started in photography can be daunting, especially when choosing the right camera. With several options on the market, it can take time to figure out where to begin. That’s why we’ve curated a list of the top 10 entry-level photography cameras to help you get started. Whether you’re just a beginner or looking to upgrade your current camera, these options will provide you with the features and capabilities you need to take great photos. From basic point-and-shoot photography cameras to more advanced options with manual controls, there’s something for everyone on this list of the top 10 entry-level cameras. So, whether you’re looking to capture memories of your family, take stunning landscapes, or create beautiful portraits, these cameras are the perfect place to start.

Product list

1. GoPro Hero10 Black

The GoPro Hero10 Black is a rugged and versatile action camera perfect for capturing all your adventures. One of the critical features of the Hero10 Black is its ability to shoot 4K video at 60 frames per second and 12MP photos. This allows you to capture stunning, high-resolution footage of your activities, whether you’re surfing, skiing, or biking. The camera also has built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, making it easy to share photos and videos with friends and family. Overall, this best beginner camera is a rugged and versatile action camera that’s perfect for capturing all your adventures. Whether you’re looking to capture stunning footage of your outdoor activities or document your travels, this best entry-level camera is a great option that offers high-quality video and photo capabilities, easy connectivity, and a wide range of shooting modes.

Specifications:

  • Camera Weight – 0.2 kg
  • Display Resolution – 552 pixels
  • Connectivity – HDMI, USB, Wireless
  • Video Format – H.264 / AVC, MPEG-4
Pros Cons
  • Rugged and durable design
  • High-quality video and photo capabilities
 



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GoPro HERO10 Black – Waterproof Action Camera with Front LCD and Touch Rear Screens, 5.3K60 Ultra HD Video, Optical 1X and Digital 4X 23MP Photos (1 Year INTL Warranty + 1 Year in Warranty)


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2. NIKON D3500

The Nikon D3500 is an excellent option for an entry-level DSLR camera that offers a wide range of features for amateur and professional photographers. One of the most notable features of the D3500 is its APS-C CMOS sensor with 24.2 MP resolution, which delivers high-quality images with incredible detail and clarity. Additionally, the camera has an ISO range of 100-25600, allowing you to shoot in low-light conditions without needing a flash. The D3500 also has an Expeed 4 image processor with 11 autofocus points, which makes it easy to take sharp photos of moving subjects. Additionally, this best beginner DSLR has a 3-inch LCD screen that makes it easy to review photos and videos.

Specifications:

  • Continuous Shooting Speed – 5 frames per second
  • Height – 9.7 cm
  • Display Style – Built-in
Pros Cons
  • Expeed 4 image processor 
 

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3. Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV

This camera is perfect for those just starting out in photography. It is a mirrorless camera that is lightweight and easy to carry around. Some of its key features include a 20MP sensor, a fast autofocus system, and 4K video recording. This entry level dslr also has built-in image stabilisation, which helps to reduce camera shake and produce sharp images.

Specifications:

  • Screen: 3-inch 180-degree tilting touchscreen
  • Megapixels: 20.3
  • Sensor: Micro Four Thirds



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4. Canon EOS Rebel SL3

This camera is an excellent option for those who are just starting out in photography and want to learn more about photography. It is a DSLR camera that is easy to use and has various features that make it perfect for beginners. Some of its key features include a 24.1-megapixel sensor, a fast autofocus system, and full HD video recording. The camera also has built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, making it easy to share photos and videos with others.

Specifications:

  • Sensor: APS-C
  • Screen: 3in vari-angle touchscreen
  • Max burst speed: 5fps
Pros Cons
  • No in-body image stabilisation
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
 



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5. Nikon Z50 compact

This photography camera is a good for those who are looking for a compact and lightweight camera. It is a mirrorless camera that is easy to carry around and has various features that make it perfect for beginners. Some of its key features include a 20.9-megapixel sensor, a fast autofocus system, and 4K video recording. The camera also has built-in image stabilisation, which helps to reduce camera shake and produce sharp images.

Specifications:

  • Effective Still Resolution: 20.9 MP
  • Monitor: 3.2-inch tilting
  • Connector Type: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Pros Cons
  • No in-body image stabilisation
 



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6. Nikon D3500

This camera is a good choice for those who are just starting out in photography and want to learn more about photography. It is a DSLR camera that is easy to use and has various features that make it perfect for beginners. Its key features include a 24.2-megapixel sensor, a fast autofocus system, and full HD video recording. The camera also has built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, making it easy to share photos and videos with others.

Specifications:

  • Effective Still Resolution: 24.2 MP
  • Optical Zoom: 3 x
  • Screen Size: 3 Inches

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7. Sony A6600

This photography camera is a great option for those looking for a high-performance camera. It is a mirrorless camera with various features that make it perfect for advanced photographers. Some of its key features include a 24.2-megapixel sensor, a fast autofocus system, and 4K video recording. The camera also has built-in image stabilisation, which helps to reduce camera shake.

Specifications:

  • Form Factor: Mirrorless
  • Effective Still Resolution: 24.2
  • Screen Size: 3 Inches
Pros Cons
  • Built-in image stabilisation
 



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8. Nikon Z fc

The Nikon Z fc is a full-frame mirrorless camera designed for professional photographers and videographers. It is a part of the Nikon Z series of cameras and has several features that make it a great option for those looking for a high-performance camera.

Specifications:

  • Effective Still Resolution: 20.9 MP
  • Connector Type: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
  • Screen Size: 3 inches
Pros Cons
  • Built-in image stabilisation
  • Limited lens selection compared to other brands



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9. Panasonic Lumix G100

The Panasonic Lumix G100 is a compact, lightweight mirrorless camera designed for vloggers and content creators. It features a Micro Four Thirds sensor and a fast autofocus system, making it a great option for capturing high-quality video and photos. Some of its key features include a 20.3-megapixel sensor, 4K video recording, and a flip-out touchscreen LCD. The camera also has built-in image stabilisation, which helps to reduce camera shake and produce sharp images. In addition, it has a unique “OZO Audio” feature that helps capture high-quality audio suitable for vloggers and content creators.

Specifications:

  • Effective Still Resolution: 20 MP
  • Optical Zoom: 2.6
  • Connector Type: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Pros Cons
  • Lack of advanced manual controls



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10. Sony ZV-E10

The Sony ZV-E10 is a compact and portable photography camera designed for vloggers and content creators. It features a 1-inch type sensor and a fast autofocus system, making it a great option for capturing high-quality video and photos.

Some of its key features include a 20.1-megapixel sensor, 4K video recording, and a flip-out touchscreen LCD. The camera also has built-in image stabilisation, which helps to reduce camera shake and produce sharp images. Moreover, it has a unique “Real-time Eye AF” feature that helps capture high-quality audio, apt for vloggers and content creators.

Specifications:

  • Effective Still Resolution: 24
  • Connector Type: USB
  • Screen Size: 3 Inches
Pros Cons
  • Limited lens selection compared to other brands



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Product Feature 1 Feature 2 Feature 3
GoPro Hero10 4K video recording Waterproof design Built-in WiFi and Bluetooth
Nikon D3500 24.2-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system Full HD video recording
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV 16.1-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system 4K video recording
Canon EOS Rebel SL3 24.2-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system Full HD video recording
Nikon Z50 compact 20.9-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system 4K video recording
Nikon D3500 24.2-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system Full HD video recording
Sony A6600 24.2-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system 4K video recording
Nikon Z fc 45.7-megapixel sensor Fast autofocus system 4K video recording
Panasonic Lumix G100 20.3-megapixel sensor 4K video recording Flip-out touchscreen LCD
Sony ZV-E10 20.1-megapixel sensor 4K video recording Flip-out touchs

Best Overall Product

The Sony A6600 is a well-rounded camera that would be suitable for a wide range of users. It has advanced features such as in-body image stabilisation and 4K video recording, a high-resolution 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor, and a fast autofocus system. Additionally, Sony has a wide range of lenses and accessories available for the A6600, making it a versatile and durable option for photography enthusiasts.

Best Value for Money

The Nikon Z50 compact is a great option for those looking for a high-quality camera at a more affordable price point. Some reasons why the Nikon Z50 compact is considered a good value-for-money product are:

Compact Size:

  • High-quality Image Sensor:
  • 4K Video Recording:
  • Fast Autofocus System:
  • Affordable Price:

In summary, the Nikon Z50 compact is an excellent choice for anyone looking for a compact, high-quality camera that can take great photos and videos, at a reasonable price.

How to find the perfect camera for beginners?

Finding the perfect camera for beginners can be a bit overwhelming, but there are a few key factors to consider when deciding. If this blog talking about entry level cameras isn’t enough, here are some steps to help you find the perfect camera for beginners:

  • Know your budget: The first step is to determine how much you are willing to spend on a camera. This will help you narrow your options and focus on cameras within your budget.
  • Decide between a mirrorless or DSLR camera: Both mirrorless and DSLR cameras have their own advantages, so it’s important to decide which one is best for you. Mirrorless cameras are usually more compact and lightweight, while DSLRs are more durable and have a larger selection of lenses.
  • Look for a camera with a high-resolution sensor: A high-resolution sensor will ensure that your photos are sharp and detailed, even in low light conditions.
  • Consider the autofocus system: Autofocus is important for capturing moving subjects, so look for a camera with a fast and accurate autofocus system.
  • Check the camera’s connectivity: With most cameras, you can transfer images wirelessly to your smartphone or tablet, This can be extremely convenient for beginners who want to share their photos on social media or for advanced users
  • who want to control the camera remotely.
  • Look for user-friendly features: Many cameras today come with various user-friendly features, such as guide mode, which will help you learn how to take better photos.
  • Read reviews: Once you’ve narrowed down your options, read reviews from other users to understand the camera’s strengths and weaknesses better.

After considering these factors, you should be able to find a camera that fits your needs and budget as a beginner.

Product price list

S.no Product Price
1. GoPro Hero10 Rs. 40,499
2. Nikon D3500 Rs. 59,999
3. Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV Rs. 90,990
4. Canon EOS Rebel SL3 Rs. 1,39,710
5. Nikon Z50 compact Rs. 68,990
6. Nikon D3500 Rs. 59,999
7. Sony A6600 Rs. 2,16,556
8. Nikon Z fc Rs. 81,980
9. Panasonic Lumix G100 Rs. 65,004
10. Sony ZV-E10 Rs. 52,490

“At Hindustan Times, we help you stay up-to-date with the latest trends and products. Hindustan Times has affiliate partnership, so we may get a part of the revenue when you make a purchase.”

Nikon Z50 firmware update adds Eye-detection AF for video


Nikon has released new firmware for the Nikon Z50 APS-C format mirrorless camera that adds Eye-detection AF capability during video recording.

Nikon Z50 firmware version 2.40 also adds improvements to eye-detection performance for Auto-area AF. What’s more, it boosts the refresh rate for the focus points displayed in live view during subject-tracking and face/eye detection AF.

Nikon Z50 firmware version 2.40 is available to download now from Nikon’s downloadcenter.

Despite now being almost three years old, the camera still ranks as one of the best APS-C cameras in our round-up, owing to its great image quality, small form factor and flexibility as a hybrid camera for both stills and video. For our full verdict, check out our Nikon Z50 review.

Digital Artist KangHee Kim Creates Ethereal Digital Photo Collages




New York-based South Korean digital artist Kanghee Kim creates ethereal digital photo collages. Kanghee Kim uses Photoshop to combine and transform the everyday images she photographs into dreamscapes that open out into a new, invigorating world. A flowering tree glimpsed in a mirror that our eye reads as a window; a creamy desert landscape stretching, in a translucent ghost image, across the walls of a city apartment: Kim’s work, a blend of the familiar and the surreal, is both haunting and reassuring.

Scroll down and inspire yourself. Check KangHee Kim’s Instagram for more information.

You can find more info about KangHee Kim:

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‘You can chart the change in the nation through its photographs’


Just over the road from the Royal Academy, Margaret Thatcher’s Spitting Image puppet leers out from an arresting window display. The former prime minister is there to welcome visitors to the Centre for British Photography, an intriguing new art space that has just opened up on Jermyn Street alongside quintessentially British brands like Paxton & Whitfield (cheese) and Hawes & Curtis (suits).

Across the doorway from Peter Fluck and Roger Law’s foam creation, another display shows Thatcher joined by members of her cabinet, also in Spitting Image-puppet form, this time captured through the lens of the photographers Andrew Bruce and Anna Fox.

They’re here because the puppets, and more importantly the photographs, are part of the collection of James and Claire Hyman. The couple have been steadily amassing a major collection of British photography over a number of years – James, the centre’s director, is also a dealer in British art, specialising in photographs.






© Provided by Evening Standard
North UK (John Bulmer Archive)

The pair have been sharing their private holdings for some time, online at britishphotography.org and by lending works to exhibitions around the UK. But now they’ve created a permanent space with free admission, right in the heart of London, to do that – and much else besides.

There are marvellous things here. From clusters of photographs by important but underappreciated photographers like Joy Gregory and Maxine Walker, addressing race and place, to artists who are new to me, like Paloma Tendero, who draws ‘veins’ over her naked body using red string, in a cumulative sequence of images. There are also pieces from Fast Forward’s project working with Rainbow Sisters – women from refugee backgrounds who identify as LGBTQ – in which they used photography as a storytelling tool.

James Hyman is keen to stress that while the centre is focused on photography in Britain, “it’s not a nationalist view of British photography”. While you can visit and “get the greatest hits”, from Bill Brandt to Martin Parr (both feature in a superb display, The English at Home), the story he wants to tell is more complex.

“You can almost chart the change in the nation through its photography, from a story that is very white and very male, to something that is much more diverse. There are many stories to tell now.”






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James and Claire Hyman (Yan Morvan)

When I talk to James, as he, Claire and their team are putting the finishing touches to the space, he’s keen to stress that the collection is only part of the story. “We actually want it to be a platform for other people to put on shows, maybe shows that are in the regions that wouldn’t otherwise get to London, or maybe getting outside curators and giving them a platform,” he says.

Cross the threshold of the gallery and this idea is clearly already in action with Headstrong: Women and Empowerment. It’s organised by Fast Forward, a research project directed by Anna Fox, which promotes women in photography, and features different forms of self-portraiture.

A group of ‘In Focus’ displays on the centre’s first floor reflect the commitment to a breadth of voices and forms of contemporary photography. It’s fantastic to see a significant group of works by Jo Spence, the feminist photographer, themed around her thesis written as a mature student in 1982, which addressed the Cinderella myth. Here, Spence uses photography alongside text and collage, as a critical tool to reflect on gender and class stereotypes, in a Britain swept up in the royal wedding of Charles and Diana.






© Provided by Evening Standard
Body Builder (Hayley Morris-Cafeiro)

Nearby is a project by Heather Agyepong, where she explores the history of the cakewalk dance, its links to enslaved peoples and how they used it as a form of resistance. Agyepong reimagines the often offensive postcards of dancers distributed in Europe during the cakewalk craze of the early 1900s, with herself as performer.

You couldn’t imagine a more different project to Agyepong’s than Natasha Caruana’s Fairytale for Sale, in which she has scoured the internet for hundreds of images of wedding dresses being sold, with the features of the brides cropped or blanked out, often crudely. Images intended to evoke romantic love become tainted and scarred; at best, a document of a commercial transaction, at worst, an emblem of broken lives.

Photography is hardly scarce in London institutions – the Photographers’ Gallery is up the road in Soho, the V&A has one of the greatest collections of the medium anywhere in the world, and the Tate, after decades of ignoring it, now has holdings to be reckoned with.






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David Hockney (Bill Brandt)

Hyman rightly says that the British focus makes it distinctive within the field. But, as the centre’s deputy director Tracey Marshall-Grant suggests, there’s an increasingly “collaborative nature” among photography institutions.

“It all works together in a unified way,” she says, “with more access to photography, more opportunities and platforms for photographers, and more ways that people experience photography as an art form. We’re not trying to fill gaps necessarily that other people aren’t [filling]. It’s more joined up: to do things in a better, bigger, more impactful way.”

The Centre for British Photography opens on Thursday January 26; britishphotography.org

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