Complaints about lack of trigger warning after BBC posts image of leopard carrying dead baboon


BBC Wildlife Magazine faces social media backlash from users moaning about lack of trigger warning on photo of baby baboon clinging onto its dead mother in jaws of leopard

  • Users were offended when BBC Wildlife Magazine posted image on Instagram
  • Taken by photographer Igor Altuna in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park
  • Some users said they were going to unfollow the magazine 

It is a stark image that shows how nature really is red in tooth and claw. 

But a photograph posted by the BBC of a leopard carrying a dead baboon in its jaws – as the primate’s baby clings in terror to her corpse has upset some on social media.

Some users on Instagram were offended that BBC Wildlife Magazine did not issue a ‘trigger warning’ when they revealed the image, which was posted to promote the Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest. 

One wrote: ‘Yes it’s nature blah blah blah but JEEEEEEZ!!! My #BlueMonday was sh*** enough without needing this punch in the face!!!’

Another said: ‘I’m unfollowing. You absolutely should not have posted this without a warning!’ 

It is a stark image that shows how nature really is red in tooth and claw. But a photograph posted by the BBC of a leopard carrying a dead baboon in its jaws – as the primate’s baby clings in terror to her corpse has upset the more sensitive among us

The photograph was taken by Igor Altuna in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park.

The leopardess’s cub played with the baby baboon for more than an hour before killing it.  

Responding to the BBC’s post, another person complained: ‘I loved seeing animals and wildlife but not this horror. 

‘Most of us are not used to this behaviour, so it’s necessary to respect sensibilities and warn about the content. It is empathy. 

A fourth wrote: ‘I agree with a lot of you that this should have come with a warning first. 

Some users on instagram were offended that BBC Wildlife Magazine did not issue a ‘trigger warning’ when they revealed the image, which was posted to promote a nature photography award shortlist

‘Also had a terrible day and I’d prefer to have a choice in what I see. So also unfollowing. 

‘For those of you who are saying things like “people can’t cope with anything these days/it’s brutal Mother Nature etc” it’s the people that are coping with a lot, maybe really horrible things/information on the daily that don’t want to see things like this to add to their pain or hardship, in the feed. 

They added: ‘I only follow uplifting things to balance my world. My job is hard and harrowing at times. 

‘I’d have liked to have had the choice, like many others have said. No need to be disrespectful or ignorant to peoples daily struggles is there.’

However, others were critical of those who complained about the lack of a content warning. 

Others were critical of those who complained about the lack of a content warning

Another said: ‘Don’t follow nature then. It’s what happens! Yes, its a compelling image. But, don’t forget that Cheetah [sic] is just doing what comes naturally. It has to kill to survive & has probably got cubs of its own to feed’

One wrote: ‘Amazing shot. Also amazed that people feel the need to comment that this image needs a “warning.” It’s neither graphic nor tasteless, it’s reality. 

‘This is nature, and nature is just as brutal as it is beautiful. 

‘BBC Wildlife is a publisher that shares nature media, and this photo is documenting a rare and incredible moment…in nature. 

If you can’t handle this photo, definitely don’t ever go on safari.’ 

The image was posted to promote the Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022 – People’s Choice Award competition.

There are 25 shortlisted images in total, chosen from 38,575 entries sent in from around the world.  

Voting closes at 2pm on Thursday, February 2. 

The contest began in the 1960s and was first run by the BBC’s Animals magazine- which is now called Wildlife magazine.

The contest grew increasingly popular and by the mid-1980s, it had joined forces with the National History Museum, who now runs the competition and its accompanying exhibition.



Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss pictured at height of their careers in Arthur Elgort exhibition


A new exhibition is celebrating the work of famed fashion photographer Arthur Elgort over the span of his five-decade career, including his unforgettable shoots with ’90s Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Kate Moss. 

Arthur Elgort On the Move is on display at the Staley-Wise Gallery in New York City until January 28, 2023, and features well-known photos as well as new images that were pulled from his archive that had never been printed or exhibited. 

Born and raised in New York City, the 82-year-old artist studied painting at Hunter College before he segued into photography. He became known for his candid ‘snapshot’ style images after making his debut in British Vogue in 1971.

Elgort, who is the father of actor Ansel Elgort, breathed new life into fashion photography by taking his models out in public and encouraging them to move freely during shoots. 

‘When my career was just beginning, I noticed that most of the magazines had plenty of studio photographers. All I saw were models standing still,’ he said in a statement. ‘So I decided to do something else. I took my models out on the streets of New York, Paris, or wherever I was, and the magazines liked it. It felt different.’ 

Fashion photographer Arthur Elgort is showcasing his work at the Arthur Elgort On the Move exhibition at the Staley-Wise Gallery in New York City. His photo of Kate Moss that was taken at Cafe Lipp in Paris for Vogue Italia in 1993 is among the highlights 

Elgort is known for his ‘snapshot’ style photography, and he captured Lisa Taylor driving over the George Washington Bridge in New York City, the wind whipping through her hair, for Vogue in 1976 

The photographer is best known for his work with Vogue, but he also shot a number of fashion campaigns. He took this black and white photo of models Rosie Vela, Alva Chinn, and Karen Bjornson (left to right) for Halston in 1977 

In 2008, Elgort had Caroline Trentini pose on top of a basketball hoop and David Alvarez leap into the air below her in this New York City shoot that was featured in Vogue

Elgort snapped this ballet-inspired photo of Naomi Campbell in Paris for Alaia in 1986, the year she was discovered. Campbell was studying ballet at the Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts in England when she was scouted 

In 1994, Claudia Schiffer was at the height of her career and looked every bit the star when she was photographed by Elgort in Rome for Valentino 

Models tended to wear less makeup when working with Elgort, who captured this stunning black and white portrait of Christy Turlington in New York City in 1993

The photographer captured Linda Evangelista playing the piano in head-to-toe plaid for Vogue shoot in Scotland in 1991

Elgort was knowing for working with models, but he also photographed The Rolling Stones standing on top of a barn at Long View Farm in North Brookfield, Massachusetts, in 1981. The band spent six weeks living and rehearsing on the property before going on tour that year 

Elgort took this playful snapshot of Gail Elliott, Yasmin Le Bon, Christy Turlington and Linda Evangelista (left to right) laughing on a New York City sidewalk in 1987 

One of Elgort’s more recent images featured in the exhibition is this photo of British model Fran Summers, which is titled ‘Up, Up, and Away.’ Summers was photographed in West Hampton, New York, for British Vogue in 2019 

Elgort traveled all of the world for his shoots, including to Nepal, where he photographed Kate Moss with an elephant for British Vogue in 1993 

The photographer captured Ethiopian model Liya Kebede and rapper Andre 3000 on a vespa for this 1950s-inspired shoot featured in Vogue in 2005

Another photo from Liya Kebede and Andre 3000’s Vogue shoot shows them mid laugh

Elgort was in Paris when he captured this portrait of German designer Karl Lagerfeld in 1983, the year he became the creative director of Chanel, a position he held until his death in 2019

Elgort photographed Christy Turlington peeking her head out the top of a car in New Orleans. The black and white shot was featured in British Vogue in 1990 

Naomi Campbell and Christy Turlington were photographed walking on the grounds at Parlange Plantation in Louisiana for Vogue in 1992

In 1976, Lisa Taylor struck a pose at the TWA lounge at John F. Kennedy International Airport while working with Elgort on a shoot for Vogue 

Elgort photographed trombonist Wycliffe Gordon performing in New York City in 1992

In 2002, the photographer captured famed designer Manolo Blahnik turned away from the camera in Paris 

Elgort traveled to Moscow to photograph Christy Turlington for Vogue in 1990, the year before the dissolution of the Soviet Union 

Elgort photographed German model Nadja Auermann running across Park Avenue in New York City for a spread featured in Vogue in 1995 

In 1982, Elgort turned the camera on himself for a self-portrait at his home in New York City 

Elgort captured these models stretching and talking on set in New York City in 1978. Titled ‘In the Studio,’ the photograph was featured in Vogue 

In 1988, the photographer shot this image of models standing around at the Christian Lacroix Haute Couture Atelier in Paris 

Model Shaun Casey was captured flinging her skirt over her head during this playful shoot for Italian Harper’s Bazaar in 1978 

Elgort took this black and white photo of a lion while visiting Africa in 1991 

Elgort’s photo of Giraffe Manor, a boutique hotel with a resident heard of giraffes in Nairobi, Kenya, was featured in Vogue in 2007 

Father and son: Photographer Arthur Elgort and his actor son Ansel Elgort pictured at The Royalton Hotel in New York City in June 2014 

Personal trainer photographed topless without her consent on a Sydney beach


A personal trainer is furious after a photos of her sunbathing topless were taken without her consent and shared by a group of men – with police powerless to do anything about it.

Lily Cook was secretly snapped with her sister on a beach in Sydney’s eastern suburbs on November 12 and only learned about the photographs hours later.

When she tried to complain to police, no charges were laid because it is not a crime to photograph people in public.

Ms Cook said finding out a photo was shared on group chats ‘had a profoundly detrimental effect upon her mental health’.

‘It is a moment in my life that will haunt me forever,’ she said, vowing to speak out after other women told her the same thing happened to them.

Lily Cook, from Sydney, (pictured) was secretly photographed while sunbaking topless on a Sydney beach earlier this month 

‘The capture and distribution of [an] explicit image of a woman without her knowledge or consent is both abhorrent and illegal. I am standing up to this issue.’

Ms Cook said she saw three men, two of which she knew socially and had many mutual friends with, when she arrived at the beach and they were later joined by their girlfriends.

She always tanned topless, but didn’t feel comfortable doing so with the men around and waited until they were leaving.

The fitness instructor received a message from a friend later that night asking if she had been topless at the beach, followed by a ‘close up’ photo of her laying on the sand.

‘The person who sent me the photo confirmed who sent him the photo,’ she wrote, on Instagram, detailing the her horrifying experience. 

‘This is when I realised a photo had been taken of me without my consent and had further been distributed.’

Ms Cook contacted the men and their girlfriends in a group message and they claimed she was accidentally caught in a wider landscape photo posted to an Instagram story by one of their friends.

She claimed this turned out to be a lie because in that image both she and her sister were lying down, but, in the photo that was shared, her sister was sitting up

‘Due to the quality of the image and the angle, it was clear one of the males had snuck closer to me to get a close-up of me topless,’ she wrote.

The images covertly taken of Ms Cook, who gave Daily Mail Australia permission to publish them. The differences between the two images unravelled a fake story she was told claiming she was accidentally caught in a wider landscape shot

Ms Cook said a man finally owned up to taking the photo off the phone of the man who originally took it, and then sent it to two friends who distributed it further.

But the man refused to make a statement to police.

‘I can’t help but think of how different this whole process would be if they had the strength and dignity to own their actions and how it can impact a woman,’ she wrote.

No one involved in the incident ever apologised to her for the ‘disgusting, perverted, and juvenile’ act, she said.

Chantelle Otten, a sexologist and girlfriend of tennis star and 2022 Australian of the Year Dylan Alcott, gave her support on Instagram.

‘This is so violating and disgusting, I can’t imagine your feelings over the days of this unfolding,’ she wrote.

‘We are all behind you, they are the problem, you are so brave in writing this post. I hope this is not swept under the rug, but adequately dealt with.’ 

Ms Cook told the Daily Telegraph she reported the incident to police but charges were not laid against the men allegedly involved.

‘I’m disappointed because I trusted that something would be done,’ she said.

Though there are laws in place to protect victims of ‘revenge porn’ – the distribution of sexually explicit images of an individual, typically by a former partner, without their consent – that doesn’t apply to her case. 

Police said it was ‘generally not an offence’ to take a photograph of any person in a public place, and only a crime if taken in private. 

‘Of course people should be able to express themselves however they want to, but unfortunately in this social media day and age, others get a kick out of either daring to take pictures when people are unsuspecting, or for the thrill of uploading,’ a senior officer told the Telegraph. 

Another officer, who works in the sex crimes field, said the outcome depended on the circumstances within each individual case, with, for example, instances of children being photographed by strangers warranting further investigation.

Ms Cook said she hoped sharing her story would empower other women who have had similar experiences 

Criminal lawyer Matt Ward said the law needed to catch up with changes in how people were using technology, as the division between public and private became blurred by the increased sharing of content on social media platforms. 

RMIT Professor Nicola Henry, an expert in imaged-based sexual abuse, agreed, saying the nuances of consent were yet to be reflected in law. 

She cited the incident in March this year when Married At First Sight contestant Domenica Calarco’s OnlyFans photos were shared among the cast without her consent.

Professor Henry said posting intimate images on a website did not necessarily equate to giving consent for them to be shared elsewhere.

Ms Cook said she struggled to understand the motive behind taking and sharing the photo, but believed those involved may gain some sense of power.

She now felt empowered sharing her story and advocating for other women who had similar experiences.

‘I am sharing my experience because I know there are women and girls out there who have experienced this same violation and like me feel overwhelmed by hurt and the burden of societal stigma,’ she wrote. 

‘I want them to know we share a bond and can draw on each other for strength.’

NSW Police said: ‘Distributing images, particularly of an intimate nature, to others without permission can have a serious impact upon a person’s health and mental wellbeing, and may lead to criminal action.

‘Images of this nature can be distributed and viewed with increasing ease and can go viral in minutes, with long-term damaging consequences for victims.

‘Even in a public setting, the privacy of others should be respected and if someone feels unsafe due to the actions of others, they should report it to police.’

Alicia Silverstone, 46, sweetly kisses turkey in Thanksgiving photo with son Bear, 11, on Instagram


My little cub! Alicia Silverstone cuddles her Bear, 11, on Thanksgiving after coming under fire for revealing they sleep in the same bed while discussing her attachment parenting philosophy

  • The actress revealed earlier this year that she still sleeps with Bear while insisting their co-sleeping arrangement was a more ‘natural’ way of doing things
  • Alicia discussed her attachment parenting process on The Ellen Fisher podcast in July and claimed she was simply ‘following nature’ by sleeping with her son
  • The Clueless sparked furious controversy in 2012 when she revealed that she fed her then-11-month-old son by pre-chewing his food and passing it from her mouth into his 
  • Alicia has been a vegan since 1998 and the animal rights activist has published two cookbooks: The Kind Diet in 2009 and The Kind Mama in 2014 

Alicia Silverstone kissed a turkey in a Thanksgiving post on Instagram that included her son Bear.

The 46-year-old vegan actress gave the turkey a smooch while sitting with the bird and her 11-year-old son Bear.

‘Happy Thanksgiving! I hope everyone is having a meaningful holiday,’ Alicia wrote as a caption for her roughly 2 million followers.

Happy holiday: Alicia Silverstone posed with her son Bear and a turkey on Thanksgiving 

Turkey kiss: The actress is a vegan activist and encouraged her fans not to eat meat this holiday season 

Alicia posted a trio of photos on social media that showed her wearing a black top while sitting with Bear and the turkey.

She had her blonde hair down in loose curls around her shoulders and showed her flawless complexion without makeup.

Alicia accessorized with hoop earrings and flashed her cute smile while wrapping an arm around Bear.

Bear kept it casual in a yellow T-shirt and orange pants.

Three photos:  The actress posted a trio of photos on social media that showed her wearing a black top while sitting with Bear and the turkey

Alicia revealed earlier this year that she still sleeps with Bear while insisting their co-sleeping arrangement was a more ‘natural’ way of doing things.

She discussed her attachment parenting process on The Ellen Fisher podcast in July and claimed she was simply ‘following nature’ by sleeping with her son.

Alicia sparked furious controversy in 2012 when she revealed that she fed her then-11-month-old son by pre-chewing his food and passing it from her mouth into his.

Attachment parenting: Alicia, shown last month in Beverly Hills, California, revealed earlier this year that she still sleeps with Bear while insisting their co-sleeping arrangement was a more ‘natural’ way of doing things

The actress earlier this month took to Instagram to encourage her followers to adopt a turkey for Thanksgiving.

‘I plan on having a kind Thanksgiving this year, and every year. I hope you’ll join me!,’ she wrote in the caption.

Alicia has been a vegan since 1998 and the animal rights activist has published two cookbooks: The Kind Diet in 2009 and The Kind Mama in 2014.

Turkey adoption: The actress earlier this month took to Instagram to encourage her followers to adopt a turkey for Thanksgiving

She has Bear with her ex-husband Christopher Jarecki, 46, who the actress was married to from 2005 until 2018.

Alicia portrayed Cher Horowitz in the 1995 teen comedy film Clueless.

She has a starring role in the upcoming crime thriller Reptile and also in the upcoming drama Tunnels.

Teen comedy: Alicia portrayed Cher Horowitz in the 1995 teen comedy film Clueless, shown in a still with co-star Stacey Dash

Ex-boyfriend ‘got his mother to send explicit photos of his ex to the girl’s father


Ex-boyfriend ‘got his mother to send explicit photos of his ex to the girl’s father the day before her birthday in revenge porn attack’

  • Matthew Cooper-Collyer, 29, allegedly sent naked pictures of ex to his mother
  • Court heard his mother then sent them to the ex-partner’s father by phone
  • Elderly parent received the unwanted images the day before victim’s birthday 

A son shared naked pictures of his ex with his own mother in a bid to get revenge on her when they split up, a court heard today.

Matthew Cooper-Collyer, 29, of Monkton Deverill, Wiltshire, is accused of threatening to disclose private sexual photos with the intent of causing distress.

His mother, Lynda Cooper, 41, has previously pleaded guilty to the same charge as well as a second offence of malicious communications after sending the images.

Helen Easterbrook, prosecuting, told Winchester Crown Court the defendant had recently split up with his girlfriend when his mother suggested in a Facebook conversation that he send images to her to which he agreed to do.

Ms Cooper had also posted: ‘Happy Birthday’ followed by the initials of the victim.

Ms Easterbrook said Ms Cooper had written that she would ‘give her drama like she loves’ and referring to the images she added: ‘Love them, perfect shots, you should have been a photographer’.

Ms Easterbrook said Cooper-Collyer had shared two intimate photos and a video with his mother who then sent them to the father of the defendant’s ex on the day before the victim’s birthday.

She said that the father ‘checked his mobile phone and found he had received two photos and a video which showed his daughter in sexually explicit poses’.

Helen Easterbrook, prosecuting, told Winchester Crown Court the defendant had recently split up with his girlfriend

Explaining the charge, Ms Easterbrook said: ‘The allegation is Mr Cooper-Collyer has shared these photos and video, they were of a private nature.

‘He did it without her permission and when he did it, he did it not by accident but intending that it would upset her, it would cause her distress.’

In police interview, Cooper-Collyer said his mother had access to his phone and had sent the images without his permission.

He said: ‘I left my phone for five minutes to go to the toilet, when I got my phone these pictures had been sent and I questioned her.

His mother suggested in a Facebook conversation that he send the images to her to which he agreed to do

‘I said ‘Why did you do this?’ She was annoyed, she said she (the victim) was going to ruin my life with things I hadn’t done, she (Ms Collyer) said ‘If she is going to do it to him, I am going to do it to her’.’

Giving evidence in court, Cooper-Collyer denied sending anyone private sexual photos or videos.

He said that in the Facebook conversation, he had posted that he had sent them but he told the court that he had not done so.

He said: ‘She has got bipolar disease and she can be very difficult to come to terms with and talk to if she is having a bad day, which she was, sometimes it’s easier to agree to a certain extent, to keep her quiet.’

He added: ‘I know the extent of what revenge porn does so I would never myself put someone through that.’

Giving evidence, Ms Cooper said that she took the images from her son’s phone without his permission and added: ‘He is innocent through this whole thing. He didn’t agree to any of the pictures.’

The trial continues.

Astrophysics photographer shares out-of-this-world Milky Way photos


A man has found his meaning in the stars by capturing incredible astrophotography after suffering a heart attack at age 20 – which then led to depression and suicidal thoughts. 

Derek Culver, 29, from the town of Issaquah in Washington, was 20 years old when he suffered a heart attack caused by myocarditis, a disease that inflames the heart.

Just a year later, a break-up once again knocked him off his feet leaving Derek struggling with his mental health, mild bipolar disorder, addiction and suicidal thoughts that had plagued him since the age of 12.

Desperate to make a positive change in his life, on his 21st birthday he packed up his camera and a tent and went on a two-week road trip to stargaze at national parks, including Yellowstone, The Grand Canyon, Arches and Zion – where he began capturing images of the night sky and fell in love with astrophotography. 

A man has found his meaning in the stars by capturing incredible astrophotography after suffering with depression, suicidal thoughts and a heart attack (Mount Shuksan pictured)

Derek Culver, 29, from Washington, began astrophotography one year after suffering from a heart attack at just 20 years old, while stargazing at national parks across the country

Inspired by photographers such as Daniel Greenwood and Jaxson Pohlman’s pictures of the night sky and his innate love for all things ‘Star Wars, space and science’ Derek produced his first series of stunning images (Bryce Canyon pictured) 

Derek said: ‘I fell in love with the peripheral aspects of astrophotography: road trips, camping, stargazing, and national parks’ (Maroon Bells pictured) 

‘I love how astrophotography and astronomy as a whole is an activity that’s super conducive for introspective thinking, perspective, curiosity, and gratitude,’ he added before noting it had an ‘amazing’ impact on his life (Death Valley pictured)

The answer is in the stars! How Derek found his meaning through astrophotography

  • Astrophysics is a branch of space science that uses the laws of physics and chemistry to better understand the universe.
  • Astrophotography combines astrophysics and photography. 
  • It sees a photographer capturing long exposure images of the night sky or deep space object such as star trails, the moon, the Milky Way or other celestial objects or deep space images including nebulae or galaxies.

 

Inspired by photographers such as Daniel Greenwood and Jaxson Pohlman’s pictures of the night sky and his innate love for all things ‘Star Wars, space and science’ Derek produced his first series of stunning images.

‘I fell in love with the peripheral aspects of astrophotography: road trips, camping, stargazing, and national parks’, he said. 

‘I love how astrophotography and astronomy as a whole is an activity that’s super conducive for introspective thinking, perspective, curiosity, and gratitude.

‘It had an amazing and healthy impact on my life!’

Using a long exposure length, Derek’s images capture the stars trailing across the night sky in some of the country’s most protected and dark habitats where light pollution is strictly monitored.

His photographs capture the incredible magnitude of ‘deep space’, showcasing the beauty of star constellations including Orion, Cygnus, and the Milky Way.

Astrophysics is a branch of space science that uses the laws of physics and chemistry to better understand the universe. 

Astrophotography combines astrophysics and photography and sees a photographer capturing images of the night sky or deep space objects such as star trails, the moon, the Milky Way or other celestial objects or deep space images including nebulae or galaxies. 

While it might seem like a lonely profession, Derek, who has now been a professional astrophotographer for eight years, says he has met many friends along the way and that astronomy saved his life. 

He said: ‘I made amazing lifelong friends who share my passion for the night sky. 

Using a long exposure length, Derek’s images capture the stars trailing across the night sky in some of the country’s most protected and dark habitats where light pollution is strictly monitored (Bryce Canyon Jaxson Waterfall pictured) 

His photographs capture the incredible magnitude of ‘deep space’, showcasing the beauty of star constellations including Orion, Cygnus, and the Milky Way

Astrophysics is a branch of space science that uses the laws of physics and chemistry to better understand the universe (White Sands National Park pictured) 

Astrophotography combines astrophysics and photography and sees a photographer capturing images of the night sky or deep space objects such as star trails, the moon, the Milky Way or other celestial objects (Desert Magic pictured) 

While it might seem like a lonely profession, Derek, who has now been a professional astrophotographer for eight years, says he has met many friends along the way and that astronomy saved his life (Mount St. Helens pictured)

‘I’ve connected with them through Instagram or out in national parks.

‘It’s always funny meeting other astrophotographers out under the stars as many good astrophotography spots are in the middle of nowhere, very dark and have larger mammals roaming around than you.

‘They are also probably a great place to hide a dead body or do some Mafia-style transaction!

‘However, it’s always a relief when you have something or someone nearby stumbling around in the dark near you, and then you see their red light or the back of their LCD screen lighting up as you hear a shutter.’

Derek claims it was a couple of ‘sappy quotes about the healing powers of nature’ that led him to find his passion for photography, which would eventually become his profession and help him manage his mental health struggles. 

Derek said: ‘I made amazing lifelong friends who share my passion for the night sky. I’ve connected with them through Instagram or out in national parks’ (Trona Cygnus pictured) 

He added: ‘It’s always funny meeting other astrophotographers out under the stars as many good astrophotography spots are in the middle of nowhere, very dark and have larger mammals roaming around than you’ (White Pocket Milky Way pictured) 

Derek claims it was a couple of ‘sappy quotes about the healing powers of nature’ that led him to find his passion for photography (White Pocket Milky Way pictured) 

Astrophotography has become Derek’s profession and has helped him manage his mental health struggles (Big Water Badlands pictured) 

Derek said: ‘There is something about being out in the middle of nowhere, under dark skies, looking up at the night sky that makes you feel extremely grounded and human’ (Magellanic Magic pictured)

Derek said: ‘There is something about being out in the middle of nowhere, under dark skies, looking up at the night sky that makes you feel extremely grounded and human.

‘Our ancestors for hundreds, thousands, and even millions of years have all looked up at the stars, gazed upon our Milky Way Galaxy we see now (plus or minus some), and it gives you a four-dimensional taste of our place in the cosmos.

‘It’s hard to articulate that feeling, you really have to go out and experience it!

‘I helped pioneer landscape astrophotography by applying the use of a German equatorial mount, or ‘star tracker’ and stacking techniques that allows me to take more detailed images of the night sky.’

Derek believes that turning our eyes to the sky can help slow down the commotion experienced in the fast pace of modern-day life. 

He added: ‘Our ancestors for hundreds, thousands, and even millions of years have all looked up at the stars, gazed upon our Milky Way Galaxy we see now (plus or minus some), and it gives you a four-dimensional taste of our place in the cosmos’

Derek believes that turning our eyes to the sky can help slow down the commotion experienced in the fast pace of modern-day life (Racetrack Orion pictured) 

Hoping to help others overcome their mental health struggles, Derek inspires people to switch up their perspectives and get a load of the outdoors on his website Blazing Heavens

 Derek said: ‘Even though our Earth is spinning and flying through space extremely fast, the sight of stars slowly drifting across the sky, away from the commotion of modern life, is remarkably peaceful’ (Cygnus Arizona Blend pictured) 

Derek said: ‘Don’t be scared to be bad at something you enjoy, take a career path other people view as silly, or pursue the things that you find meaningful’ (Chalk Pyramid Milky Way pictured) 

Hoping to help others overcome their mental health struggles, Derek inspires people to switch up their perspectives and get a load of the outdoors on his website Blazing Heavens.

He added: ‘Even though our Earth is spinning and flying through space extremely fast, the sight of stars slowly drifting across the sky, away from the commotion of modern life, is remarkably peaceful.

‘Don’t be scared to be bad at something you enjoy, take a career path other people view as silly, or pursue the things that you find meaningful.

‘I wouldn’t be the artist or man I am now if I didn’t have the struggles with health and mental health at a young age, and I believe having the courage to embrace our flaws and weaknesses is a crucial part of unlocking our God given potential!’

The photographer is also an aspiring NFL kicker, and is currently training towards this goal.