South Okanagan astrophotographer captures amazing photos of green comet | iNFOnews



Debra Ceravolo captured this image of Comet C/2022 E3 from her home in Osoyoos on Jan. 21.

Image Credit: SUBMITTED/Debra Ceravolo



January 26, 2023 – 6:00 PM







A green-tailed comet is close enough to earth for Osoyoos photographer Debra Ceravolo to snap a couple sharp images of the phenomenon.


But capturing C/2022 E3 ZTF in such detail is not as easy as pointing and shooting.


To create such bright and crisp images of the comet, Ceravolo continuously snapped photos with exposures of one minute for an hour-and-a-half. Those images were then stacked together to diminish noise in the final product. But since everything in space is in motion, only about one-third of the photos were used in the stacking process, as the entire collection would cause some features to blur.


“It’s really tough to get a sharp image of a comet because the stars move independently of it,” she said.

Comet C/2022 E3 on Jan. 20.

Image Credit: SUBMITTED/Debra Ceravolo


“Similar to the aurora, after 30 seconds it looks really smeared, but in a five-second exposure you can see lots of streaks and structure.”


Ceravolo used a Canon R6 which was attached to a telescope designed by her husband, Peter Ceravolo. She began honing her skills as an astrophotographer 12 years ago to market his products.


Anybody interested in witnessing C/2022 E3 ZTF can currently get a good look at it with a pair on binoculars, Ceravolo said, as long as the sky is clear. She’s hopeful it will be visible with the naked eye by the end of January, but realizes the brightness of any comet is difficult to predict.


The comet’s position in the sky will be near the Little Dipper today, Jan. 26, and when it reaches its closest point to earth on Feb. 1, it can be found near the Camelopardalis constellation, according to space.com.


The best time to look for it is during the early hours of darkness before sunrise. And it’s expected to remain visible – at least through telescopes and binoculars – for much of February.



To contact a reporter for this story, email Dan Walton or call 250-488-3065 or email the editor. You can also submit photos, videos or news tips to the newsroom and be entered to win a monthly prize draw.


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News from © iNFOnews, 2023



Y/OUR Denver Photography highlights city in flux


Even though many of us see the Denver skyline daily, there are all kinds of new perspectives and little touches that we may never notice. But the Y/OUR Denver 2022 photography exhibit, the fifth annual collaboration between Denver Architecture Foundation and Colorado Photographic Arts Center, aims to provide viewers the chance to get a new look on architecture and design around the state.

The digital exhibition is online through Feb. 28, and features the winning photographs from the Doors Open Denver photography competition, which offered artists a larger group of subjects than ever before.

“This year, we opened up the photo contest and exhibition to images of Colorado architecture, not just Denver architecture,” wrote Pauline Marie Herrera, president and CEO of the Denver Architecture Foundation, in an email interview. “I’ve enjoyed seeing the striking photos of architectural sites from around our state.”

According to provided information, participating photographers of all skill levels were invited to find and photograph their favorite architectural spaces in Denver and throughout the state. All forms of architectural imagery were eligible: black and white, color, exterior, interior and detail images.

“It’s interesting to see the types of architecture that makes up the different neighborhoods and houses and just how varied our architecture is,” said Samantha Johnston, executive director and curator of CPAC and juror for the competition. “It’s so exciting for me to see how photographers capture spaces we think about all the time.”

Of the 233 entries, Johnston selected 30 finalist images, including the following for four winners:

Best in Show: “Justice Center Dome” by Ernie Leyba

Best Exterior: “Breaking a Bridge” by Mark Stein

Best Interior: “Williams Tower” by Lauren Sherman-Boemker

Best Detail: “Camouflage” by Carol Mikesh

“I hope people who see the exhibit come away with an appreciation of Denver’s (and Colorado’s) architecture and a desire to explore it,” Herrera wrote. “I also hope they understand what it means to our quality of life and its importance to our future.”

Since she has served as juror for the last five years, Johnston has learned that seeing the many wonderful photographs people submit can make any day out in Denver a kind of adventure — one that more people can participate in.

“When you walk around the city, you can look up and say, ‘Oh, that’s where they took that shot,’” she said. “It gives people an appreciation for things they maybe haven’t seen and an appreciation for the city changing.”

See the photographs in the exhibition at https://denverarchitecture.org.

 

The hills are alive at PACE with ‘Sound of Music’

Even if you don’t like musicals, there are some that have just been so thoroughly embraced by the culture that you can’t get away from them. “The Sound of Music” might be at the very top of that list – it’s immortal. For longtime fans and newbies, the Parker Arts, Culture, and Events (PACE) Center has brought the story of Maria Augusta Trapp and the von Trapp family to the stage this winter.

The musical runs at PACE, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., through Feb. 4. The final collaboration between Rogers and Hammerstein, come see classics like “My Favorite Things” and “Sixteen Going on Seventeen.” For information and tickets, visit parkerarts.org/event/the-sound-of-music/.

 

LSO hosts annual family concert

“Babar the Elephant” is one of the stories that really connected with me when I was growing up. Originally by Jean de Brunhoff, the popular 1938 children’s book is based on a story that his wife Cecille told to their children. French composer Francis Poulenc wrote a musical composition that follows Babar as he moves to the city and all the adventures he has in his new home.

For the Lakewood Symphony Orchestra’s annual family concert, the group will perform Poulenc’s music at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway. As is tradition, conductor Matthew Switzer will begin by teaching the children a bit about the world of music.

Get tickets for this great concert at www.lakewoodsymphony.org.

 

Clarke’s Concert of the Week — Sun June at Why Bonnie at the Hi-Dive

You gotta love some indie rock this time of year – albums that are drenched in guitar reverb and swirling vocals can just wrap you up during the cold winter months. Two wonderful examples of what the genre can be are both from Austin, Texas: Sun June and Why Bonnie. Sun June’s 2021 album, “Somewhere,” and Why Bonnie’s 2022 release, “90 In November,” both were among my favorite releases of their respective years and really hit their target vibes.

 

Both bands will be stopping by the Hi-Dive, 7 S. Broadway in Denver, along with Porlolo at 9 p.m. Jan. 28. The Hi-Dive is a great venue for this kind of music, so take the opportunity to send off January and get tickets at https://hi-dive.com/.

 

Clarke Reader’s column on culture appears on a weekly basis. He can be reached at [email protected]



Colorado bear takes 400 ‘selfies’ on wildlife camera – New York Daily News


A Colorado bear is the talk of the nature photography world after it appeared in 400 selfies on a wildlife camera set up in Boulder.

“Recently, a bear discovered a wildlife camera that we use to monitor wildlife across Boulder open space. Of the 580 photos captured, about 400 were bear selfies,” Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks wrote earlier this week on Twitter.

In followup tweets, the department clarified that the photos had been taken and posted on their Instagram page in late 2022 and that the bear was likely hibernating.

According to the BOSMP website, the department uses nine motion-detector-activated cameras to track a number of different species — like birds, coyotes and, of course, bears — across 46,000 acres.

The cameras use infrared technology so as to not disturb the animals’ nocturnal adventures.

“The motion-detecting cameras provide us a unique opportunity to learn more about how local species use the landscape around us while minimizing our presence in sensitive habitats,” said Will Keeley, senior wildlife ecologist for Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks. “These cameras play an important role in helping BOSMP staff identify important wildlife areas.”

In December, the department posted a series of photos of a pair of howling coyotes.



Save over $200 on the Panasonic Lumix G100 mirrorless camera


If you’re looking for an excellent mirrorless camera that offers good specs and is easy to use, then why not save over $200 and grab the Panasonic Lumix G100.

The $202 discount means this camera is 27% off and we rate it as one of the best beginner cameras you can find on the market. It’s also well suited for content creators as it features a selfie mode, a built-in microphone, 4K video and 20.3MP stills shooting, as well as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity for easier uploading and sharing.

At a time when many people are looking to save money where they can, this saving is a huge one but if it’s not quite what you’re looking for you can always check out our round-up of the best camera deals right now. We also have guides for the best cameras, best cameras for astrophotography and best mirrorless cameras, which are worth checking out if you’re looking for a new camera.






© Provided by Space


Panasonic Lumix G100 Mirrorless Camera was $749.99 now $547.99 on Amazon

Save $202 on an excellent beginner camera that is well-suited for vloggers, influencers, content creators and on-the-go use. It captures both images and video in 4K, has a 20.3MP resolution and weighs only 412g. It’s a mirrorless camera that comes with a built-in mic with tracked audio, a selfie mode, facial detection and hybrid five-stop image stabilization. View Deal

You can save $202 by getting this camera from Amazon, which is great, but what makes this camera worth getting? Most notably, you can shoot both images and video in crystal clear 4K and the still resolution is 20.3MP.

It’s worth remembering that it’s a mirrorless camera, so it’s compact and lightweight in design, which is ideal for on-the-go use. In fact, it weighs a mere 412g, so portability really isn’t an issue with this camera.

This camera also features tracked audio, a built-in microphone, a selfie mode, facial detection and hybrid five-stop image stabilization. There are Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connection options too, so you can upload and share what you capture to your computer or smartphone which really helps those wanting to broadcast what they shoot on social media. 

Panasonic’s Lumix G100 is definitely better suited for those not necessarily looking for an advanced camera but still want excellent results. It features good image and video shooting specs and is compact enough that transporting it isn’t an issue. You can also save big bucks by getting it on Amazon so if you’re in the market for a new camera and a good deal, this could be what you’re looking for.

Follow Alexander Cox on Twitter @Coxy_97Official. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.



Tyre Nichols was a son and father who enjoyed skateboarding, photography and sunsets, his family says




CNN
 — 

Tyre Nichols was a father, a man who loved his mama and a free-spirited soul who was looking for a new life in Memphis, Tennessee.

That life was tragically cut short earlier this month after a violent arrest by five officers with the Memphis Police.

Now, as attention turns to the five former officers being charged with second-degree murder in Nichols’ death, according to court documents, Nichols’ family wants the world to know the man Nichols was.

The 29-year-old was the baby of his family, the youngest of four children. He was a “good boy” who spent his Sundays doing laundry and getting ready for the week, his mother, Ravaughn Wells, said.

“Does that sound like somebody that the police said did all these bad things?” Wells said. “Nobody’s perfect OK, but he was damn near.”

“I know everybody says that they had a good son, and everybody’s son is good, but my son, he actually was a good boy,” she said.

Above all else, Nichols loved being a father and loved his son, his family said.

“Everything he was trying to do was to better himself as a father for his 4-year-old son,” attorney Benjamin Crump said at the family’s news conference.

Nichols was someone who brought everyone joy. “When he comes through the door, he wants to give you a hug,” Crump said, speaking on behalf of Nichols’ family.

Nichols moved to Memphis right before the Covid-19 pandemic and got stuck there when things shut down, his mother said. “But he was OK with it because he loved his mother,” she added.

His mom said he loved her “to death” – so much so that he inked it permanently.

“He had my name tattooed on his arm, and that made me proud because most kids don’t put their mom’s name, but he did,” Wells said with a laugh.

“My son was a beautiful soul and he touched everyone,” she said.

Nichols became friends with an unlikely group of people because they kept showing up to the same Starbucks around the same time in the morning, his friend Nate Spates Jr. said.

A couple times a week, these five or six friends would sit together, put their phones away so they could be present and enjoy each other’s company, said Spates, who met Nichols about a year ago at a Starbucks in Germantown, Tennessee.

The group didn’t talk much about their personal lives, and they never touched politics. But sports, particularly football, and Nichols’ favorite team, the San Francisco 49ers, were regular topics.

Nichols was a “free spirited person, a gentleman who marched to the beat of his own drum,” Spates told CNN. “He liked what he liked. If you liked what he liked – fine. If you didn’t – fine.”

Spates said he saw himself in Nichols and recognized a young man who was trying to find his own way and learning to believe in himself.

He saw Nichols grow and start to believe he could do whatever “he set out to do in this world,” Spates said.

Spates’ favorite memory of Ty, as he called Nichols, was last year on Spates’ birthday, when Nichols met Spates’ wife and 3-year-old at their usual Starbucks. He watched Nichols play with his toddler and talk to his wife with kindness.

“When we left, my wife said, ‘I just really like his soul. He’s got such a good spirit,’” Spates said.

“To speak about someone’s soul is very deep,” he said. “I’ll never forget when she said that. I’ll always remember that about him.”

Spates joins the rest of Nichols’ family and wider Memphis community in being frustrated at the lack of information that has come out about the traffic stop that resulted in Nichols’ death. He said he’s had to do a lot of compartmentalizing to be able to even speak about his friend.

“I just hope that this truly does open up honest dialogue, and not dialogue until the next one happens, but a dialogue for change,” he said.

Nichols’ daily life was ordinary at times, as he worked and spent time with family, but he also made time for his passions, his mom, Wells, said.

After his Starbucks sessions, he would come home and take a nap before heading to work, said Wells, with whom he was living. Nichols worked the second shift at FedEx, where he had been employed for about nine months, she said.

He came home during his break to eat with his mom, who would have dinner cooked.

Nichols loved his mom’s homemade chicken, made with sesame seeds, just the way he liked it, Wells said.

When he wasn’t working, Nichols headed to Shelby Farms Park to skateboard, something he had been doing since he was 6 years old. He would wake up on Saturdays to go skate or sometimes, he’d go to the park to enjoy the sunset and snap photos of it, his mom said.

“My son every night wanted to go and look at the sunset, that was his passion.”

Photography was a form of self-expression that writing could never capture for Nichols, who wrote that it helped him look “at the world in a more creative way,” on his photography website.

While he snapped everything from action shots of sports to bodies of water, landscape photography was his favorite, he wrote.

“I hope to one day let people see what i see and to hopefully admire my work based on the quality and ideals of my work,” he wrote. He signed the post: “Your friend, – Tyre D. Nichols.”

Skating was another way Nichols showed the world his personality. A video montage of Nichols on YouTube shows his face up close with the sun shining behind him before he coasts up and down a ramp on his skateboard. He grinds the rail and does tricks on his board in the video, which was shown at a news conference by his family’s attorney Crump.

Sunsets, skateboarding and his positive nature were all things that Nichols was known for, longtime friend Angelina Paxton told The Commercial Appeal, a local paper.

Skating was a big part of his life in Sacramento, California, where he lived before he moved to Memphis, Paxton said.

“He was his own person and didn’t care if he didn’t fit into what a traditional Black man was supposed to be in California. He had such a free spirit and skating gave him his wings,” Paxton said.

Paxton and Nichols met when they were 11 years old and attending a youth group, she told the Appeal.

“Tyre was someone who knew everyone, and everyone had a positive image of him because that’s who he was,” Paxton said. “Every church knew him; every youth group knew him.”

When Paxton found out about Nichols’ death, she crumbled, she told CNN affiliate WMC.

“My knees gave out,” she told WMC. “I just fell because I could not believe that someone with such light was taken out in such a dark way.”

Paxton attended Nichols’ memorial service earlier this month in Memphis. She said she represented the people in California who knew him and wanted to support his family.

“There would be a couple thousand people in this room,” Paxton told WMC, if the memorial had been in Sacramento. “He was such an innocent person. He was such a light. This could have been any of us.”

For his family, seeing the turnout and feeling the outpouring of support meant a lot.

Nichols’ stepfather Rodney Wells told WMC: “My son is a community person, so this (memorial) was good to see.”



Great Barrington: Local youth’s image wins Mass Audubon photo contest | Community News


Charlie Jaferian of Great Barrington been named a winner in Mass Audubon’s 2022 “Picture This: Your Great Outdoors” photography contest. Jaferian took top honors in the contest’s People in Nature category, under-18 division, for his image of a line of cross-country skiers in his Berkshire town.

The statewide conservation organization’s annual photo competition attracted more than 7,000 submissions from hundreds of photographers of all ages, backgrounds and abilities.

Contest categories included People in Nature, Birds, Mammals, Other Animals, Landscapes, and Plants and Fungi. Participants entered in their appropriate age groups: 18-and-older or under-18.

All images must have been shot in Massachusetts or at Mass Audubon’s Wildwood Camp in Rindge, N.H., but may have been taken any time prior to or during the 2022 contest period.

Chatham resident Kimberly Robbins’ image of a Great Egret balancing on one foot with wings spread was named the grand prize winner.

As a category winner, Jaferian receives a $100 gift card, redeemable at a Mass Audubon shop or wildlife sanctuary.

To see all winning photos and honorable mentions, visit massaudubon.org/picturethis.



Join our astrophotography events at Jodrell Bank | StaffNet


25 Jan 2023

Discover how you can use simple equipment to capture different images of the night sky

Our popular astrophotography workshops are returning this winter.

Introduction to astrophotography – 15 February, 7:30pm – 10pm

Join us for an informal and fun session that includes an introductory workshop (co-presented by Jodrell’s Dr Ant Holloway), along with a chance for you to try out your equipment on-site at Jodrell Bank.

You’ll learn how to use your DSLR or Compact System Camera to get started in Astrophotography. You’ll also discover how you can use simple equipment such as a tripod, to capture different images of the night sky, from planets and constellations to the colours of stars and star trails. There’ll be a chance too, to look at additional equipment you can use to expand the range of images you make.

No previous knowledge is required to attend this session but you will require your own camera with full manual controls.

Outdoor clothing and waterproof footwear is advisable. Observing the night sky is weather permitting.

Advanced astrophotography – 15 March, 7:30pm – 10pm

Do you already have some experience in photography and are looking to get some extra tips and tricks from an expert? Our advanced course offers astrophotographers the chance to extend their knowledge and help them achieve breath-taking night sky photography.

The session follows on from our Introduction to Astrophotography and includes a detailed talk by Jodrell’s Dr Ant Holloway followed by an in-depth demonstration of software packages including ‘Deep Sky Stacker’ and ‘Star Trails’.

Please note, this is a theory-based session, and the evening won’t include any practical outdoor work. As ever, you can expect a warm welcome and the chance to meet like-minded people and to talk to our knowledgeable team.

Both events are suitable for adults and young people 14+ and hot drinks will be provided.

Image credit: Dr Ant Holloway

OUR HOMETOWN: Williams Lake photographer strives to capture moments, record history


A visual storyteller from the time she was a teenager, Laureen Carruthers has been a professional photographer in Williams Lake for over 15 years.

Her love for photography began after she saw an enlarged photograph her high school art teacher, David Abbott, had taken of his daughters, which included Carruthers’ lifelong friend, Kelly Abbott. She recalled looking up at that photo and instantly knowing that she wanted to take photos of her own children like that one day.

Now, she photographs just about everything, from intimate portraits of mothers with their newly born babes to action-packed rodeo photos. Her photos are warm and authentic, capturing precious moments that might otherwise be forgotten.

When looking at her work, it’s as if you’ve walked into a memory and are now truly there. You can hear the rushing water as a fisherman carefully stabilizes himself against jagged rocks while holding out a net of fish. You feel the wind from the bride’s dress as her groom whisks her into the air.

Time stands still in a photograph, yet in her work, you see an entire story unfolding.

Carruthers is drawn to what’s real, and she “[tries] to capture that no matter what genre [she is] photographing.”

While she could never pick a favourite moment as a photographer, she cherishes being able to photograph children, like the photos of her own boys with her father who has since passed. Encapsulating moments like that is something she’ll never forget.

Carruthers opened her photo studio around 2012 after outgrowing her basement, where she was photographing families and newborns. Her studio allowed her more space, far superior lighting and the ability to grow her business into commercial work as well.

Outside of her studio, she’s built special connections with the Tsilhqot’in National Government, where she works for them on a contract basis. She loves all she’s learned about the First Nations culture and traditions, including “how the elders are treasured” and being able to photograph them, with “their faces [having] so much to tell.”

She also volunteers some of her time, where annually she photographs the Williams Lake Stampede and more recently the Williams Lake Stampeders hockey team. She was drawn to sports photography after her boys got into things like mountain biking and soccer. Some of her volunteer work is much harder but leaves bereaved parents with truly invaluable keepsakes – photos of their adored stillborn babies. Carruthers said, “this one is really hard to do, but I feel is so very important,” including trying to capture precious moments between family members who are in the process of losing a loved one.

“I want to take photos that will matter in years to come, be it for families, maybe history lessons… Things that will make a difference in people’s lives.”

As for the future, Carruthers said she will always continue to learn and would love to do more travel photography, allowing her to see and learn about more cultures. She believes that “life imitates art” and that “all of [her] work is because of who [she is] and how [she sees] things in the world. [Her] photos are just an extension of things [she sees and feels].”

Along with her high school art teacher, David Abbott, some of her influences include Sue Bryce, whom she saw in Seattle after she won a trip to see her, and Annie Leibovitz, whose lighting and art direction she studies. She’s also inspired by old movies and paintings.

As for her own advice for aspiring photographers, she encourages them to learn everything they can about light, and not to simply rely on Photoshop. Photography means “drawing with light,” and “knowing light is by far the most important element of a good photo,” Carruthers said.

While camera-shy herself, Carruthers encourages people to get photos of themselves taken because “they are the only keepsakes we have of moments that will never again happen. They are history… We all matter. We are all a story that needs to be told and remembered.”

Her work has been published many times. One of the highlights of her career was when she won a Canada-wide photo contest through Getty Images. She was flown out to Toronto where she accepted her award.

In her personal life, Laureen and her partner Joel Gyselinck, who also works as her second shooter at weddings, enjoy living on an acreage on the outskirts of the city. Their hobbies include gardening and caring for their growing mix of animals including chickens, miniature donkeys, a pony, a horse, one goose, a cat and their basset hounds.

Recently, she was nominated by an anonymous community member for a BC Small Business Award, which she says “is truly an honour. Receiving letters of support over the last few days has moved me to tears and really helped me realize just how much my work matters in people’s lives, and I honestly feel like this is enough. Winning would be awesome, but feeling the love and appreciation I have over this last week is really enough.”

While she would love to have less social media in her life, social media is a helpful avenue in her receiving business and sharing her work. Her website is www.laureencarruthersphotography.com. You can also find her on Instagram and Facebook by searching Laureen Carruthers Photography.


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Laureen Carruthers photography

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Laureen Carruthers photography

Laureen Carruthers photography

Laureen Carruthers photography



Preliminary data on a novel smart glasses system for measuring the angle of deviation in strabismus


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  • The Mezzanine Gallery to Exhibit Roger Matsumoto’s Printing with Palladium from February 3-23

















    The Mezzanine Gallery to Exhibit Roger Matsumoto’s Printing with Palladium from February 3-23 – State of Delaware News



























    On view from February 3-23, 2023

     

    Wilmington, Del. (January 25, 2023) – The Delaware Division of the Arts’ Mezzanine Gallery presents 2022 DDOA Individual Artist Fellow Roger Matsumoto’s exhibition, “Printing with Palladium”, running February 3-24, 2023. Guests are invited to attend a Meet-the-Artist Reception on Friday, February 3 from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

    Roger Matsumoto has been involved with photography since he learned the basics during his junior high school days. The photographer for his school newspaper, Matsumoto also did astrophotography using an 8-inch telescope that he made. But “I did not consider what I was doing to be any form of art.” It was only later – on a climbing trip to Yosemite during college – that he “purchased a small booklet of Ansel Adams photographs that made me see what photography was capable of.”

    He then began to study seriously, taking a photography class at the University of Utah. After exploring silver printing and some “alternative” processes during the 1970s (including Cibachrome color work), Matsumoto discovered printing with palladium, now his primary process. Since he began exhibiting in 1982, his work has been seen in over 200 shows, including at the Fleischer Art Memorial (Philadelphia), Foundry Art Center (St. Louis, MO), Delaware Art Museum (Wilmington), and the London (England) Camera Club, where his print won first prize. Matsumoto also has prints in the collections of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Utah Museum of Fine Art, and Philadelphia Museum of Art (three prints).

    Though Ansel Adams’ photographs were the pivotal inspiration for his work and his artistic practice, Matsumoto was also influenced by the work of Karl Blossfeldt and Brett Weston. His current process “extends the purely photographic image with brushed lines or areas” applied at the same time as the palladium coating, making each print a “distinct realization of the negative” – a monoprint. Matsumoto is also exploring a new series called “Stereo Pair” that mimics the stereo cards popular at the end of the 19th century.

    The Newark resident was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. His father was in the Army, and (with his mother and sister) Matsumoto lived in Tokyo for three years as a child in a U.S. military housing base. The family eventually relocated to the Pacific Northwest, and Matsumoto lived in the Seattle region until after graduate school. He then moved to Salt Lake City. He came to Delaware from Salt Lake City and has lived here since 1988, “the longest I’ve been in one place.”

    Matsumoto’s palladium images are almost exclusively of botanical subjects. He can make negatives at any time during the year, but “I print in palladium only in the winter when the humidity is low.” This means that often months elapse between creating the negative and printing it. The pandemic, “while not actually a complete re-set of my past practice,” allowed him to try out new films. But there’s been a recent spike in the cost of palladium (and all art supplies), and Matsumoto is also challenged by the “changes made in the materials I use.” However, he’s looking forward to exhibiting again. “These prints need to be seen in person, not only on a monitor or cell phone screen.”

    The Mezzanine Gallery, open weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., is located on the second floor of the Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French Street, Wilmington.

    Image: “16-13a”. Palladium Monoprint. 12″x20″. 2016.

    ###

    Contact: Andrew Truscott, Program Officer, Marketing and Communications

    302-577-8280, [email protected]

    The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is dedicated to cultivating and supporting the arts to enhance the quality of life for all Delawareans. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. For more information about the Delaware Division of the Arts, visit arts.delaware.gov or call 302-577-8278.

    Print

    Related Topics:  art exhibit, art exhibition, Art Loop Wilmington, Carvel State Office Building, Individual Artist Fellowship, Mezzanine Gallery, photography, Roger Matsumoto

    Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

    Here you can subscribe to future news updates.

    On view from February 3-23, 2023

     

    Wilmington, Del. (January 25, 2023) – The Delaware Division of the Arts’ Mezzanine Gallery presents 2022 DDOA Individual Artist Fellow Roger Matsumoto’s exhibition, “Printing with Palladium”, running February 3-24, 2023. Guests are invited to attend a Meet-the-Artist Reception on Friday, February 3 from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

    Roger Matsumoto has been involved with photography since he learned the basics during his junior high school days. The photographer for his school newspaper, Matsumoto also did astrophotography using an 8-inch telescope that he made. But “I did not consider what I was doing to be any form of art.” It was only later – on a climbing trip to Yosemite during college – that he “purchased a small booklet of Ansel Adams photographs that made me see what photography was capable of.”

    He then began to study seriously, taking a photography class at the University of Utah. After exploring silver printing and some “alternative” processes during the 1970s (including Cibachrome color work), Matsumoto discovered printing with palladium, now his primary process. Since he began exhibiting in 1982, his work has been seen in over 200 shows, including at the Fleischer Art Memorial (Philadelphia), Foundry Art Center (St. Louis, MO), Delaware Art Museum (Wilmington), and the London (England) Camera Club, where his print won first prize. Matsumoto also has prints in the collections of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Utah Museum of Fine Art, and Philadelphia Museum of Art (three prints).

    Though Ansel Adams’ photographs were the pivotal inspiration for his work and his artistic practice, Matsumoto was also influenced by the work of Karl Blossfeldt and Brett Weston. His current process “extends the purely photographic image with brushed lines or areas” applied at the same time as the palladium coating, making each print a “distinct realization of the negative” – a monoprint. Matsumoto is also exploring a new series called “Stereo Pair” that mimics the stereo cards popular at the end of the 19th century.

    The Newark resident was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. His father was in the Army, and (with his mother and sister) Matsumoto lived in Tokyo for three years as a child in a U.S. military housing base. The family eventually relocated to the Pacific Northwest, and Matsumoto lived in the Seattle region until after graduate school. He then moved to Salt Lake City. He came to Delaware from Salt Lake City and has lived here since 1988, “the longest I’ve been in one place.”

    Matsumoto’s palladium images are almost exclusively of botanical subjects. He can make negatives at any time during the year, but “I print in palladium only in the winter when the humidity is low.” This means that often months elapse between creating the negative and printing it. The pandemic, “while not actually a complete re-set of my past practice,” allowed him to try out new films. But there’s been a recent spike in the cost of palladium (and all art supplies), and Matsumoto is also challenged by the “changes made in the materials I use.” However, he’s looking forward to exhibiting again. “These prints need to be seen in person, not only on a monitor or cell phone screen.”

    The Mezzanine Gallery, open weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., is located on the second floor of the Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French Street, Wilmington.

    Image: “16-13a”. Palladium Monoprint. 12″x20″. 2016.

    ###

    Contact: Andrew Truscott, Program Officer, Marketing and Communications

    302-577-8280, [email protected]

    The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is dedicated to cultivating and supporting the arts to enhance the quality of life for all Delawareans. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. For more information about the Delaware Division of the Arts, visit arts.delaware.gov or call 302-577-8278.

    Print

    Related Topics:  art exhibit, art exhibition, Art Loop Wilmington, Carvel State Office Building, Individual Artist Fellowship, Mezzanine Gallery, photography, Roger Matsumoto

    Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

    Here you can subscribe to future news updates.