Sculptor Josh Gluckstein Creates Stunning Lifelike Animal Sculptures




London-based Sculptor and Painter Josh Gluckstein creates stunning lifelike animal sculptures. Animals have always been a central theme Josh’s artwork. He recycles cardboard and other discarded materials into striking lifelike animal sculptures.

Its accessibility and versatility allows him to bring the animal to life and capture their character and intriguing beauty while creating zero waste. Josh Gluckstein ambition is to raise awareness for endangered species through my art and contribute to their preservation.

In his words about his work “Inspired by my extensive travels and volunteering through Asia, Africa and South America, I have sought to capture the presence of some of the most majestic animals I have seen by creating life-size sculptures, often made from found and recycled materials. I have continually strived to make my practice more and more sustainable, and my new collection is made entirely of recycled cardboard and paper.”

Scroll down and inspire yourself. Please check Josh’s Instagram and Website for more amazing work.

You can find Josh Gluckstein on the web:

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The stunning Welsh picture which has won an illustrious photography award


A picture of one of the most picturesque sights in Wales has been chosen as the winner of an illustrious award. Will Davies decided to enter a beautiful picture entitled ‘Brecon in Winter’ into the Landscape Photographer of the Year awards, which was founded in 2006, and considered one of the highest accolades to be had in the field.

The 42-year-old grew up in Usk, but moved to study and work overseas including a ten-year spell in Africa, and he now lives in Washington DC pursuing a career in international development. But Mr Davies tries to get home as much as he can, and during 2019, managed to take a stunning photo of Brecon which he decided to enter into the awards.

And he admitted he was stunned when he received a phone call to say that not only had his photograph been chosen to feature within the Landscape Photographer of the Year collection book, but he had won the competition outright to be crowned Landscape Photographer of the Year and receive a £10,000 cash prize.

READ MORE: Country home in a national park with sweeping views and a surprise converted barn






© Will Davies
‘Brecon in Winter’






© Will Davies
Will Davies

Mr Davies explained: “The competition is something I’ve followed for a number of years as I have been interested in landscape photography. I never thought I’d have any chance of winning it. I’ve been based overseas a lot for work, but I spent just over a year back in Wales in 2019, then 2020, 2021, and I was able to get a decent number of photos together and I thought I’d might as well have a go. For me, a great result would have been to just get in the collection, because it’s quite prestigious, and just getting a photo in the book would have been an achievement.

“To then find out that the photo I took of Brecon actually won the whole thing was amazing. I was pretty shocked. I think it is the first time a Welsh photo has ever won the overall category. My dad used to take me up the Brecon Beacons pretty often walking and fishing and that kind of thing. I was so pleased the winning picture was one from close to home. I’m trying to spend more and more time back in Wales and I think this has motivated me even more to get over as much as I can.

“I have played around with cameras since I was a kid, but it was probably travel which brought it out for me. Spending time in Africa really first got me obsessed with the landscapes, and the wildlife and everything else. What’s been nice is when you come back home you realise how beautiful your own country is, and taking these amazing photos almost on your doorstep back home has been really nice.

“We’re doing a renovation in the house at the moment and the trophy is in a box, but I’ll have to find a mantlepiece to put it on! My mum has been buying up copies of the book and handing them out, and I’ve been getting prints of the photo as well so it makes nice Christmas presents. I’ve spent a lot more printing them for friends and family than I have made out of selling them that’s for sure! I’m hoping to get back for Christmas, hopefully we’ll have some snow over Brecon Beacons and I can take some more to enter for next year.”

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Reality of Ukraine War Laid Bare in Stark New Photography Collection


Photojournalist Lynsey Addario could not have been a closer witness to the devastation of the war in Ukraine when Russian forces fired mortar shells as civilians tried to evacuate from Irpin, near Kyiv, on March 6.

A round exploded only feet in front of her and her colleague, leaving four members of a family, including two children, dead on the street.

“That was extremely difficult because we were both in shock,” she told Newsweek, “it’s rare as a journalist that you are actually in the attack that you end up photographing.”

The image by Justyna Mielnikiewicz shows roadblocks on the main road leading from Kyiv to Kharkiv. The image is from the book “Relentless Courage: Ukraine and the World at War” published by Blue Star Press.
Justyna Mielnikiewicz/ MAPS for WSJ

She had previously defended her controversial image after it was published on the front page of The New York Times, as an important testament to Russian aggression.

It is one of a collection of striking pictures by photojournalists in a newly released photo book, Relentless Courage: Ukraine and the World at War, published by Blue Star Press, which documents the human cost of President Vladimir Putin’s full-scale invasion.

“A lot of the policies and punishments that have been imposed on Putin have been because of the testimonies and the documentation of journalists on the ground, whether it’s from the war crimes in Bucha to the intentional targeting of civilians,” she said.

“I’ve covered war for over two decades and I’ve rarely seen people pay attention to my coverage the way they have in Ukraine,” she said.

Connecticut-born Addario received a Courage in Journalism award from the International Women’s Media Foundation this year and was part of a New York Times team that won a Pulitzer prize in 2009 for their coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Unflinching in their depictions of the impact of war, the book’s images from five featured photojournalists and other photographers document death, evacuations, burials and the trauma endured by Ukrainians.

This photo by Carol Guzy shows Kyiv resident Oleksandra Yemelianovna Kulahyna, 93, who was a nurse for 43 years. Although she shares memories of WWII, she couldn’t comprehend that the Russian invasion had begun.
Carol Guzy
A young boy looks out the bus window after leaving the Kharkiv metro station after seeking shelter there for three months after Russia’s invasion. The photo by Svet Jacqueline is from the book “Relentless Courage: Ukraine and the World at War”
Svet Jacqueline

Justyna Mielnikiewicz was in Dnipro on February 24 when the war started. “It was like the whole country within a day was just hit,” she told Newsweek. “The scale of the attack was so overwhelming.”

Covering the war for The Wall Street Journal, she said that after the initial shock of the invasion, she noticed Ukrainians got to work organizing themselves with volunteer centers being set up.

There were logistical difficulties in getting around, not helped by gasoline shortages and the dangers posed by the fact that the “whole country had become a frontline.”

“It’s important to show people as individuals and not some kind of anonymous mass representing some abstract suffering. I believe in showing individual stories,” Mielnikiewicz said.

“In a time of war, I think you just tune into other people’s emotions,” she said. While she saw herself as a chronicler of the war, it was still important to help where she could. “I’m still a human.”

Meanwhile, another of Addario’s images in the book was taken right at the start of the war during a mass mobilization of volunteers. Flanked by two women holding guns is a teacher called Yuliya looking up in tears.

Ukrainian volunteer Yuliya (center) cries as she is transported to a center for volunteer fighters in Kyiv on February 26, 2022. The image was taken by Lynsey Addario.
LYNSEY ADDARIO
This image by Carol Guzy is part of a collection from the photo book “Relentless Courage: Ukraine and the World at War” published by Blue Star Press and distributed by Penguin Random House.
Carol Guzy

“I asked her, ‘why are you crying?’ And she said, ‘I’m scared. I’m scared for my country. I’m scared for my future,'” said Addario.

“It was incredible to me to see a teacher go and despite her incredible fear, to volunteer and she’s still in the military,” she said.

“I have witnessed that sort of resilience and determination to fight against the Russians from the very beginning and that’s what sort of made this war unique for me.

“As well as this incredible bravery, people are so unified and they are totally determined to not let Russia take over their country.”

Digital Artist Julien Tabet Creates Photo-Manipulations Of Animals In Surreal Situations




French Renes-based digital artist Julien Tabet creates photo-manipulations of animals in surreal situations. Julien’s specialty is to relook at animals by re-interpreting the laws of Nature, in order to share a world different from the one we know. His images are made of fantasy, fun, poetry, and seem to have no limits.

His work is 100% digital, combining photo manipulation and illustration. He always pays attention to detail, on the border between realism and fantasy.

Scroll down and inspire yourself. Please check Julien’s more amazing work on his Website and Instagram.

You can find Julien Tabet on the web:

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Te Hīkoi Toi: Photography that captures our people and places


Sebastian Clarke (Ngāti Awa, Pākehā) is a writer and researcher interested in New Zealand architectural and craft histories.

On my daily walk into the city, I’m frequently reminded of all the things in my own neighbourhood I never stopped to photograph: the humpy roof of architect Ian Athfield’s freshly demolished First Church of Christ Science on Willis St, one of countless fantastic window displays at Hunters and Collectors, or a particularly witty protest sign I saw near Parliament years ago. After a quick moment of regret, I reconcile myself by remembering I live in the same city as Andrew Ross.

Ross talks about his photography as a duty. Attentive to the ever-evolving nature of his city, Wellington, Ross has been active in documenting local scenes on the precipice of change for over 30 years. At Photospace Gallery on Courtenay Place, Ross’ latest exhibition, People and Places, has recently opened.

It’s the photographer totally in his large format, silver gelatin print element. Ross is often recognised as a master photographer of historic places, however, it’s not just the age of a building where the appeal lies. Ross talks about being drawn to environments that “feed the souls” of their inhabitants. This extends beyond homes, to bookstores, music venues, ceramics studios, and motorcycle garages, all of which he has photographed for this exhibition.

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And although he’s behind the camera, these are all environments where Ross is a part of the community or a friend to his subject. This familiar association is apparent in his works. There is a quiet sympathy present in his photographs. You can appreciate this in the images where Ross’ subjects meet the camera with a sense of ease, and the trust and faith they have in their photographer’s perspective is plain to see. One such image is that of Rainbow Books on Riddiford St, Newtown, where the bookstore owner Brian Stenner and dog Tag sit proudly in front of the teeming bookstore alongside friends, Lindsey and Gordon.

Ross’ photographs of people are excellent, but it is his photographs without them that I find the most beguiling. While they may not appear in the frame, these interior images reveal to us so much about people and serve as worthy portraits of those who cultivate their lives within these spaces.

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Living Room Glenside 2022 is a riot of a room but despite the chaos the photograph is meticulous.

The photograph of a Glenside living room is a prime example. Here is a riot of a room, where objects abound and light fittings are put to work as coat stands. But despite this chaos, the photograph is meticulous. The room is suspended still, as light pours in and every interior element is captured with Ross’ signature precision. As a viewer, this photograph and many others in People and Places are ones to luxuriate in – demanding you to get up close and bask in their details.

Exposure Exhibition He Kahoni Kitea, the annual graduate showcase at Massey University College of Creative Arts, continues this week. It is always worth a visit and this year I was especially impressed by the photography of Iolo Adams and Amber-Jayne Bain, both graduating with a Bachelor of Design with Honours.

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Massey graduate Iolo Adams’ work ‘Studies in Natural Temporality’ at Exposure.

Iolo Adams’ installation Windows to Yesterday and Tomorrow includes verdant images of the Wairarapa bush. The images have been carefully constructed to offer a generous study of this environment. In one photograph, a mirror has been inserted into the landscape enabling the single image to convey multiple, meta views of the sun-soaked Wairarapa scene. The result is visually dynamic and technically accomplished. The same level of care has gone into the curatorial arrangement of Adams’ photographs at Exposure which come together as an immersive and striking presentation.

The Rogues Gallery is a series of powerful portraits by Bain. Here, Bain has photographed a range of fellow photographers, writers, and other artistic people with the intent of capturing something of their creative essence. Each subject has been photographed by Bain twice, with two distinct approaches to portraiture having been utilised. There are relaxed, contextual photographs of the featured individuals in their own environments as well as close-up studio portraits that immediately command attention.

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Portrait of Natalie Jones by Amber-Jayne Bain, at Exposure.

Bain’s images of arts practitioner Natalie Jones evidence the photographer’s dual method. In one image, Jones is seen working away into the night from inside her caravan office, while her accompanying portrait shows a very different Jones positioned in the centre of the frame against a deep red backdrop, staunchly looking right at the viewer. Bain has a real skill for this latter kind of photography, depicting her subjects with a confident blend of humanity and strength.

Both Adams and Bain have physical photobooks to accompany their exhibited works and, with a show as expansive as Exposure, it is well worth allowing plenty of time to not only enjoy the works installed within the galleries, but also to view these and other photobooks which have been finely assembled and offer further perspectives on the work of these emerging photographers.

  • People and Places, Photospace Gallery, until Jan 28. Exposure Exhibition He Kahoni Kitea, Massey, until Nov 25.

PRINT: Sebastian Clarke (Ngāti Awa, Pākehā) is a writer and researcher interested in New Zealand architectural and craft histories.

Eastern Shore photographer captures beauty of the shore from unique perspective


EASTERN SHORE, Va. (WAVY) – The Eastern Shore of Virginia has nearly 60 miles of barrier islands. These islands, unique in their beauty and shape, are often missed by visitors or even residents since they are only accessible by boat or plane.

Flying his open cockpit airplane, Gordon Campbell spends time soaring over the shore – looking for anything that catches his eye. The brisk wind rushed by him as his aircraft slowly moves along the coast – at around 30-45 mph.

“I sit out in front of the wing, the engine is behind me – I have very little wind in my face, and I can be free as a bird and take these images,” Campbell said.

His images, both breathtaking and vivid, are displayed all around the Eastern Shore. From his one-of-a-kind gallery in Cape Charles, the Barrier Island Visitor Center in Machipongo, and at many restaurants and businesses from seaside to bayside. 

Sally Dickinson, Executive Director of the Barrier Island Center and Museum, said she and others at the center use them to teach visitors about the barrier islands and their history.

“The barrier islands are constantly changing and shape-shifting so Gordon can take a snapshot of what they were one year or even one month and it will be different after a nor’easter or hurricane or just the shape-shifting the barrier islands do,” Dickinson said.

The barrier islands Gordon sees today are elements of history. Years ago, many of the islands housed resorts or homes for people to visit. Today, nobody lives on the barrier islands, but they are still a critical part of life on the shore.

From the fishermen and oystermen who make their living from the water to the engineering marvel that is the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, Gordon has captured it all at various times throughout the year and day.

To really appreciate the beauty of the Eastern Shore, Gordon says you have to get off of Route 13.

“People drive up and down this road all the time but they don’t see anything if they don’t get off route 13. To really see it you have to get out on a boat or a plane. ” 

Gordon says that some of the sights that he sees seem out of this world.

“I’m just capturing what is out there and I happen to be pointing my lens in the right direction… but I’m blown away by this beautiful earth we have,” Gordon explained. “Sometimes I put my camera down and I can’t believe what we’re looking at.” 

The At Altitude Gallery is located in Cape Charles, VA at 245 Mason Ave and is the only known gallery to feature aerial photography exclusively. For hours, call the museum at 757-394-9200.

Man And Bear Are Friends Over The Years And Then She Brings Her Cubs To Meet Him




Man and bear are friends over the years and then she brings her cubs to meet him. Bears can be intimidating because of their strength and their size, but they can also be adorable animals. In this video, we see a man who has had a black bear come and visit him for years bring her brand new cubs to meet him. It is such a sweet moment.

Patrick Conley is from Asheville, North Carolina where black bears are very common and known to be comfortable with humans. The momma bear has come to visit Patrick Conley pretty often over the years and one day, she brought her newborn cubs to meet him!

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#9 OMG! Bear Simone Brought Her Cubs!


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Explore the power of photography at the MFA’s newest exhibition


Explore the power of photography at the MFA’s newest exhibition

Decades of Life Magazine’s publications are on display, which spark deep thought about the past and future



SHAYNA: LIFE MAGAZINE AND THE POWER OF PHOTOGRAPHY, A NEW EXHIBIT PRESENTED BY THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS BOSTON IN PARTNERSHIP WITH PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM. >> THIS IS AN EXCITING OPPORTUNITY FOR US TO LOOK AT THE WEEKLY PICTURE MAGAZINE FROM 1936 TO 1972. SHAYNA: THE EXHIBITION OFFERS A SNAPSHOT INTO MANY OF THE MAGAZINE MOST RECOGNIZABLE IMAGES, SAYS THE SENIOR CURATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHS AT THE MFA. >> YOU CAN SEE NOTES WRITTEN BY PHOTOGRAPHERS AND REPORTERS, AND WHAT ALL THIS TELLS US IS PHOTOJOURNALISM IN THE 20TH CENTURY WAS A COLLABORATIVE ENTERPRISE. SHAYNA: AMONG THE MORE THAN 30 PHOTOGRAPHERS WHOSE WORKS ARE FEATURED IS MARGARET BOURKE WHITE, WHOSE IMAGE OF FORT PECK DAM LANDED ON THE COVER OF THE FIRST ISSUE OF LIFE. >> SHE WAS ONE OF THE FIRST FOUR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ONE OF THE ONLY WOMEN IN THE EARLY YEARS. SHAYNA: IN 1948, ORDEN PARK PROPOSED A PHOTO ESSAY TO THE MAGAZINE ABOUT HARLEM GANG WARS. >> HE WOULD PHOTOGRAPH RED JACKSON, THE HEAD OF A GANG. HE WENT INTO HIS HOME AND PHOTOGRAPHED HIM WITH HIS MOTHER AND SHOWS A VERY SENSITIVE PORTRAYAL OF FRED JACKSON, WHICH IS DIFFERENT THAN IMAGES ONE WOULD IMAGINE OF A GANG LEADER. IT WAS AFTER PITCHING THAT STORY THAT LIFE HIRED GORDON PARKS AS A STAFF DOG RIVER. SHAYNA: THE EXHIBIT IS DESIGNED IN THREE HISTORICAL SECTIONS, WHICH REFLECT THE MAGAZINES ROLE IN SHAPING WAR, RACE, AND NATIONAL IDENTITY. >> THIS MAGAZINE WAS CREATED FOR PREDOMINANTLY A WHITE, MIDDLE-CLASS AUDIENCE. WE THINK ABOUT HOW THINGS ARE SHAPED. IN THE EXHIBITION WE SHOW NOTES AND OTHER THINGS TO SHOW THE DISPARITY BETWEEN TEXT AND IMAGE. SHAYNA: IN BETWEEN THE SECTIONS, WORKS BY THREE CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS. LIFE MAGAZINE AND THE POWER OF PHOTOGRAPHY ON DISPLAY THROUGH MID-2023. FINALLY TONIGHT, WE HAD A BLAST HERE AT THE HOLIDAY MARKET. IT WILL BE OPEN THROUGH DECEMBER 30 1, 7 DAYS A WEEK, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THANKSGIVING, CHRISTMAS DAY, AND DECEMBER 26. THERE IS SO MUCH TO SEE AND ENJOY. I AM SHAYNA SEYMOUR. ANTHONY, BACK TO YOU IN THE STUDIO. ANTHONY: SHAYNA HAS BEEN SINGING CHRISTMAS SONGS FOR A MONTH ALREADY. GET OUT OF THE COLD NOW AND ENJOY SOMETHING WARM TO DRINK. THAT IS CHRONICLED TONIGHT. THANKS FOR JOINING US. I AM ANTHONY EVERETT. HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN TOMORROW

Explore the power of photography at the MFA’s newest exhibition

Decades of Life Magazine’s publications are on display, which spark deep thought about the past and future

Life Magazine and the Power of Photography: A new exhibit presented by the Museum of Fine Arts Boston in partnership with Princeton University Art Museum.

Life Magazine and the Power of Photography: A new exhibit presented by the Museum of Fine Arts Boston in partnership with Princeton University Art Museum.

Ashton pupil scores certificate of excellence for birding photography


One Ashton International pupil is showing huge promise in photography.

Grade 7 pupil Haydn Mc Clure has been doing nature and bird photography for about 18 months, and is a member of Ballito Photo Club, where he has recently been promoted to a two star.

He is also a member of PSSA.

Haydn with his PSSA certificate.

Photographers can apply twice a year to the PSSA for a Certificate of Excellence.

Haydn applied for his COE in September to the PSSA Youth mixed panel, and was awarded the certificate of distinction.

Red-billed Quelea. Photo: Haydn Mc Clure.

His passion lies with bird photography and he is a passionate birder, as are his mom and dad.

His birding life list is on 350 and he has become adept at identifying birds.

 


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5 Mistakes To Avoid When Photographing Nighttime Events


Nighttime photography is one of the most challenging types of photography one can execute. Not only does it require more gear than daytime photography, but it also requires you to use that gear for more extended periods without getting tired.

It’s easy to make mistakes when photographing at night, and some mistakes can significantly impact your shots. And so, here are five common errors people make when shooting nighttime events so you can avoid them!

#1 Shooting In Auto Mode

When photographing nighttime events, don’t use auto mode. Auto mode will make your photos look washed out and flat, even if you’re shooting under bright lights. Consider setting it to manual mode to get the best results from your camera. By setting it to the manual, you’ll be able to control three critical settings: aperture (or f-stop), shutter speed, and ISO sensitivity.

First, set your aperture as wide as possible so that more light enters the lens. This trick will also create a shallow depth of field, meaning that most objects in front or behind the focal point are blurred out—great for taking portraits. If you’re not sure what aperture to use for fireworks, wedding, or concert shots, further reading will help.

Next up is shutter speed. The longer this setting lasts, the more likely there will be motion blur because our eyes can only process so much information simultaneously. If there’s too much movement happening on stage during an event, then increase this setting until everything looks crisp again!

Last comes ISO sensitivity which directly affects how much light enters through each pixel sensor inside each pixel. Higher numbers mean brighter pictures but also introduce noise (grainy pixels) into images without proper postprocessing techniques like noise reduction software programs.

#2 Not Using A Tripod

When photographing nighttime events, it’s essential to use a tripod. A tripod is the best way to ensure your camera remains steady and prevents blurriness in your photographs.

It can be especially true when shooting outdoors, where fewer lighting options are available to you than indoors. It’s also more difficult for your eyes to adjust quickly.

In addition, using a tripod will allow you to take long exposures without hand-holding your camera. This is important because it will enable you to capture more light and create a much brighter image than if you were shooting handheld.

#3 Moving During Long Exposure Shots

One of the main reasons photographers use tripods is to avoid camera shakes. When using a long exposure, your shutter stays open for several seconds. If you don’t have a tripod in hand and want to take your photo, it’s best not to move at all while the shutter is open.

If you need to move around while photographing nighttime events, such as weddings and concerts, find your spot first then take a photo without moving. You should also wait until after all movement has stopped before taking another long exposure shot with your camera.

#4 Only Shooting Landscape Shots

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of finding unique angles and lighting, but don’t forget that you’re shooting a nighttime event. That means there will also be people there. So why not capture some portraits of them? A great way to do this is by using an accessory flash on your camera that can be used as a fill light when shooting portraits.

Another thing to remember is that these events are almost always held in venues with lots of detail. So make sure you take advantage of this opportunity by shooting those details as well—the venue itself, the decorations, etc.

Finally, don’t forget to take shots at regular intervals throughout the event to capture every moment.

#5 Overusing Flash

Remember that flash can be harsh on the eyes. It’s too bright, distracting, and can cause red eyes. Flash photography is also not suitable for people or objects in motion.

Furthermore, they may appear as a series of frozen frames rather than fluid movements. It is why many sports photographers use a fast shutter speed to freeze the action.

In low-light situations where you need to use your camera’s built-in flash indoors or outdoors, consider turning off autofocus and auto exposure. That way, you can manually adjust your settings until you find what works best to capture that special moment without disturbing anyone else.

Conclusion

With this list of tips, you can start on the right foot when photographing nighttime events. If you’re new to photography, these tips might seem common sense—but they’re easy to forget when you’re in the moment and trying to capture every second of an event. By keeping these points in mind while shooting at night, you can ensure that your photos look great and tell a compelling story!


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