What’s in my bag: pro wildlife photographer Katie Mayhew


There is no right answer when it comes to choosing the right kit. What works for you might hinder someone else and vice versa, it really all comes down to what you’re shooting and what your preferences are. 

Wildlife photographer and videographer Katie Mayhew is a veteran in her field and during her time working for the BBC, Channel 4 and Netflix, she would’ve used a wide variety of different kit. Her current preferred setup however includes the powerful Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 4.6K G2 camera – a video focussed cine camera with 15 stops of dynamic range, a super 35mm 4.6K sensor and the ability to shoot 2K at up to 300fps which is super slow motion.

Accompanying her main camera, Katie shoots with an array of fast Canon lenses (opens in new tab) and Sigma lenses plus a Laowa probe lens (opens in new tab) for those close-up macro shots in hard-to-reach places. 

Katie Mayhew is a veteran wildlife photographer and videographer. Starting her career with Silverback Productions, she has produced content for Netflix, the BBC, Disney Nature, Channel 4, and Apple TV. Her projects have ranged from uninhabited islands off the coast of Mexico to filming forest fires in California – as well as closer to home, shooting a variety of wildlife and macro productions.

1. Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 4.6K

(Image credit: Under the Oak Films)

This is my workhorse camera; it’s been everywhere with me and endured a lot. I love that it’s versatile – I can use it without a viewfinder, and over- or under-sling it without having to re-rig. The camera body is nearly vertically symmetrical to the center of the sensor so I can achieve very low-angle shots when under slinging the camera. 

The built-in ND filters are brilliant, they mean that I don’t have to change external filters when the light levels change. I’m looking at trying the URSA 12K as well at some stage, and the common interface will make the change easier.

Looking for the best BlackMagic cameras?

I’ve been shooting most of my forthcoming documentary, 15 Years, on this, and it’s got a really nice focal length, a very shallow depth of field and creates a sharp, abstract images very easily. All of that makes it perfect for shots of people – 15 Years is about David Plummer, a Natural History Photographer and Filmmaker with Parkinson’s Disease. The film aims to inspire others with disabilities, showing that filming the natural world can be an accessible career choice or hobby.

(Image credit: James Artaius / Digital Camera World)

This is my all-time favorite lens; even at F32 it’s still got a nice shallow depth of field, and being a macro lens you can film extremely close-up with great bokeh. The strangest-looking insects look brilliant with a glossy, out-of-focus background (even leeches … more on those later!)

This is a really solid, standard establishing lens – it’s my ‘jack of all trades’ lens, with a relatively good minimum focal distance. This means that you can get fairly close up to animals, but without losing the environment behind them, which is crucial for a lot of nature films, to set the scene. It is also rather sharp.

(Image credit: Future)

This lens has a really small front element, so you can get right down to the level of an insect or inside a hole. I tend to put it on a slider and get a bug’s eye view, sliding between individual blades of grass – it looks absolutely amazing. The only downside is that it’s F14, so it does need quite a lot of light for the best possible look.

(Image credit: David Plummer)

This is my go-to, affordable wildlife lens. It’s versatile, lighter than a lot of cinema lenses and five to ten times cheaper. It does need quite a lot of support, but that’s very normal for long telephoto lenses!

7. Miller 3155 Arrow X7 Tripod

This is essential for supporting long lenses like the Sigma Telephoto. It’s got a great fluid head, and is relatively light, which is great when you have to carry a whole kit bag a long way!

8. Camouflage Rain Cover

Essential in both the UK and Borneo! This has been designed for long lenses and fits the URSA really well – it’s completely waterproof and hooks over the camera and fits underneath the tripod really well. It’s also good if you need somewhere to sit and eat your sandwiches.

9. Leatherman

Leatherman: I couldn’t be without my multi-tool, although it’s usually the first thing to go missing. I’ve had a few occasions where I thought I’d lost it, only for it to re- appear in a completely different bag or pocket. As well as a lot of conventional stuff, I’ve had to use it for prying leeches off my skin in the jungle in Borneo; if you use your hands, they just transfer to the other hand!

You might also like to read: Blackmagic 12K or 4.6K cinema camera for $5,995? I know which I’d go for (opens in new tab)! and to find out about the best cinema cameras (opens in new tab).

Maker Faire Orlando celebrating 10th anniversary this weekend – Orlando Sentinel

Creators, dreamers, artists and do-it-yourselfers of all ages and backgrounds will gather this weekend for a celebration of grassroots innovation and homegrown ingenuity.

Maker Faire Orlando celebrates its 10th anniversary during the two-day festival at Central Florida Fairgrounds Nov. 5-6. The event showcases the creativity of Florida’s maker community through hands-on demonstrations and activities for the entire family.

Cosplay, in particular, will take the spotlight at this year’s gathering with costume makers showing off their handmade props and attire.

“Especially for the artists in the cosplay community, what they like is the opportunity to show their craft more so than just exhibiting the final product,” said Ian Cole, the Orlando event’s founder. “There are a lot of mentors in our crowd, a lot of people who will help someone else get started and learn.”

Cole was inspired to create this forum for Orlando’s maker community after visiting a similar event in California.

“I took my oldest son, who was 11 at the time, to Bay Area Maker Faire in San Francisco in 2011, and we both left so pumped up and amazed and excited. There’s that feeling when you meet your tribe,” Cole said. “We thought 300 people would show up and it would be a fun party with our friends and 2,500 people showed up the first year.”

That’s when Cole became an “accidental event producer” and knew the festival would persist.

“Makers feel like everyone is a maker,” he said. “For us to connect different communities and have them show off their craft, and get new people into their communities, it’s just super rewarding.”

Things to Do

Weekly

A look at entertainment and sporting events in Orlando and around Central Florida.

Asher Adams remembers the first Orlando mini Maker Faire when he showcased a PVC instrument that resembled something the Blue Man Group might play. In recent years, his interest has pivoted to photography.

“During the pandemic, I started taking interest in backyard astrophotography. It was something that was really easy and accessible to do from home,” Adams said. “I fell down that rabbit hole of learning everything you can do to capture the night sky from home, which was really cool.”

At Maker Faire Orlando, Adams will return for the first time in nearly a decade to display his astrophotography rig and answer questions for aspiring shutterbugs.

“Even if it’s just doing stuff with your iPhone, there are so many good resources between your camera, star charts and apps,” he said. “I’m excited to be back and excited to hopefully help people learn about the night sky.”

A decade into this festival’s Central Florida tenure, organizers anticipate 10,000 attendees and 250 exhibits including power racing, combat robots, learn to solder, take-it-apart and make-a-shirt. Other exhibits allow visitors to experience drones, daleks, belt sander racing and homemade creations of all kinds.

“Some people are looking for a hobby, some people are looking for their next business venture. It’s a great place to come feel the vibe where anything is possible if you set your mind to it,” Cole said. “You have this amazing group of creative, innovative people all in one space. You can’t go wrong with a crowd like that.”

  • When: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 5-6
  • Where: 4603 W. Colonial Drive in Orlando
  • Tickets: $15 for youth and students and $20 for adults in advance; $20 for youth and students and $25 for adults once the event begins. First responders, active military and veterans, employees of schools, colleges, universities, home-school educators and libraries receive free admission.
  • Parking: On-site parking is free.
  • Food: Vendors are available at the festival.
  • More information: makerfaireorlando.com

Find me @PConnPie on Twitter and Instagram or send me an email: pconnolly@orlandosentinel.com. For more fun things, follow @fun.things.orlando on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

Alex & Caroline | Caroline Logan Photography


It was a beauuutiful fall day with plenty of sunshine and I just couldn’t have been more honored to be Alex & Caroline’s photographer. <3 Their day was an exact depiction of who they are… easy-going, full of laughter, and so much joy.

 

One of my favorite things about being a wedding photographer is watching the way each couple of mine is cherished and celebrated by their very favorite people… and Alex & Caroline were no exception! Makes me SO happy because they’re just the kind of people that deserve the world. <3

 

Alex & Caroline, may these photos forever bring you back to the day your marriage began… I’m so honored to have been the one to document each moment! Sending hugs! Xo

 













































































For Photographers: Love creamy skintones & soft colors? Learn to edit light & airy here!





Source link

UK Biobank retinal imaging grading: methodology, baseline characteristics and findings for common ocular diseases


  • Fight For Sight. Time to focus. 2020. https://www.fightforsight.org.uk/media/3302/time-to-focus-report.pdf.

  • GBD 2019 Blindness and Vision Impairment Collaborators & Vision Loss Expert Group of the Global Burden of Disease Study Causes of blindness and vision impairment in 2020 and trends over 30 years, and prevalence of avoidable blindness in relation to VISION 2020: the Right to Sight: an analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study. Lancet Glob Health. 2021;9:e144–e160.

    Article 

    Google Scholar 

  • Yau JWY, Rogers SL, Kawasaki R, Lamoureux EL, Kowalski JW, Bek T, et al. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes Care. 2012;35:556–64.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Ogurtsova K, da Rocha Fernandes JD, Huang Y, Linnenkamp U, Guariguata L, Cho NH, et al. IDF Diabetes Atlas: global estimates for the prevalence of diabetes for 2015 and 2040. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2017;128:40–50.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Demmin DL, Silverstein SM. Visual impairment and mental health: unmet needs and treatment options. Clin Ophthalmol (Auckl, N. Z.). 2020;14:4229–51.

    Article 

    Google Scholar 

  • Kortuem K, Fasler K, Charnley A, Khambati H, Fasolo S, Katz M, et al. Implementation of medical retina virtual clinics in a tertiary eye care referral centre. Br J Ophthalmol. 2018;102:1391–5.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Wagner SK, Fu DJ, Faes L, Liu X, Huemer J, Khalid H, et al. Insights into systemic disease through retinal imaging-based oculomics. Transl Vis Sci Technol. 2020;9:6.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Chua SYL, Thomas D, Allen N, Lotery A, Desai P, Patel P, et al. Cohort profile: design and methods in the eye and vision consortium of UK Biobank. BMJ open. 2019;9:e025077.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • UK Biobank. UK Biobank research ethics approval. 2021. https://www.ukbiobank.ac.uk/learn-more-about-uk-biobank/about-us/ethics.

  • Kuan V, Denaxas S, Gonzalez-Izquierdo A, Direk K, Bhatti O, Husain S, et al. A chronological map of 308 physical and mental health conditions from 4 million individuals in the English National Health Service. Lancet Digital Health. 2019;1:e63–e77.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Foster PJ, Buhrmann R, Quigley HA, Johnson GJ. The definition and classification of glaucoma in prevalence surveys. Br J Ophthalmol. 2002;86:238–42.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Landau WM. The targets r package: a dynamic make-like function-oriented pipeline toolkit for reproducibility and high-performance computing. J Open Source Softw. 2021;6:2959.

  • Landau WM. Tarchetypes: archetypes for targets. 2021. https://docs.ropensci.org/tarchetypes/.

  • Blischak JD, Carbonetto P, Stephens M. Creating and sharing reproducible research code the workflowr way. F1000Res. 2019;8:1749.

  • Wickham H, Averick M, Bryan J, Chang W, McGowan LD, François R. et al. Welcome to the Tidyverse. J Open Source Softw. 2019;4:1686.

    Article 

    Google Scholar 

  • Warwick A. Ukbwranglr: functions to load and wrangle UK Biobank data. 2022. https://rmgpanw.github.io/ukbwranglr/.

  • Warwick A. Codemapper: functions for mapping between clinical coding systems. 2022. https://rmgpanw.github.io/codemapper/.

  • Patil I. Visualizations with statistical details: the ’ggstatsplot’ approach. J Open Source Softw. 2021;6:3167.

  • Xie Y. Knitr: a general-purpose package for dynamic report generation in r. 2022. https://yihui.org/knitr/.

  • Sjoberg DD, Whiting K, Curry M, Lavery JA, Larmarange J. Reproducible summary tables with the gtsummary package. R J. 2021;13:570–80.

  • Gohel D. Flextable: functions for tabular reporting. 2022. https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=flextable.

  • Desai P, Minassian DC, Reidy A, Allen N, Sudlow C. Number of incident cases of the main eye diseases of ageing in the UK Biobank cohort, projected over a 25-year period from time of recruitment. Br J Ophthalmol. 2018;102:1533–7.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Wong WL, Su X, Li X, Cheung CMG, Klein R, Cheng C-Y, et al. Global prevalence of age-related macular degeneration and disease burden projection for 2020 and 2040: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Glob Health. 2014;2:e106–116.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Klein R, Meuer SM, Myers CE, Buitendijk GHS, Rochtchina E, Choudhury F, et al. Harmonizing the classification of age-related macular degeneration in the three-continent AMD consortium. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2014;21:14–23.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Brandl C, Zimmermann ME, Günther F, Barth T, Olden M, Schelter SC, et al. On the impact of different approaches to classify age-related macular degeneration: results from the German AugUR study. Sci Rep. 2018;8:8675.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Ferris FL, Wilkinson CP, Bird A, Chakravarthy U, Chew E, Csaky K, et al. Clinical classification of age-related macular degeneration. Ophthalmology. 2013;120:844–51.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Klein BE, Klein R, Sponsel WE, Franke T, Cantor LB, Martone J, et al. Prevalence of glaucoma. The Beaver Dam Eye Study. Ophthalmology. 1992;99:1499–504.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Silvestri G, Williams MA, McAuley C, Oakes K, Sillery E, Henderson DC, et al. Drusen prevalence and pigmentary changes in Caucasians aged 18-54 years. Eye (Lond, Engl). 2012;26:1357–62.

    Article 
    CAS 

    Google Scholar 

  • Schachat AP, Hyman L, Leske MC, Connell AM, Wu SY. Features of age-related macular degeneration in a black population. The Barbados Eye Study Group. Arch Ophthalmol (Chic, Ill 1960). 1995;113:728–35.

    Article 
    CAS 

    Google Scholar 

  • Bressler NM, Bressler SB, West SK, Fine SL, Taylor HR. The grading and prevalence of macular degeneration in Chesapeake Bay watermen. Arch Ophthalmol (Chic, Ill: 1960). 1989;107:847–52.

    Article 
    CAS 

    Google Scholar 

  • Munch IC, Sander B, Kessel L, Hougaard JL, Taarnhøj NCBB, Sørensen TIA, et al. Heredity of small hard drusen in twins aged 20-46 years. Investigative Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2007;48:833–8.

    Article 

    Google Scholar 

  • Sandberg MA, Tolentino MJ, Miller S, Berson EL, Gaudio AR. Hyperopia and neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ophthalmology. 1993;100:1009–13.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Ikram MK, van Leeuwen R, Vingerling JR, Hofman A, de Jong PTVM. Relationship between refraction and prevalent as well as incident age-related maculopathy: the Rotterdam Study. Investigative Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2003;44:3778–82.

    Article 

    Google Scholar 

  • Lavanya R, Kawasaki R, Tay WT, Cheung GCM, Mitchell P, Saw S-M, et al. Hyperopic refractive error and shorter axial length are associated with age-related macular degeneration: the Singapore Malay Eye Study. Investigative Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010;51:6247–52.

    Article 

    Google Scholar 

  • Jonas JB, Nangia V, Kulkarni M, Gupta R, Khare A. Associations of early age-related macular degeneration with ocular and general parameters. The Central India Eyes and Medical Study. Acta Ophthalmologica. 2012;90:e185–191.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Li Y, Wang J, Zhong X, Tian Z, Wu P, Zhao W, et al. Refractive error and risk of early or late age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One. 2014;9:e90897.

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Mitchell P, Smith W, Attebo K, Healey PR. Prevalence of open-angle glaucoma in Australia. The Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmology. 1996;103:1661–9.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Dielemans I, Vingerling JR, Wolfs RC, Hofman A, Grobbee DE, de Jong PT. The prevalence of primary open-angle glaucoma in a population-based study in The Netherlands. The Rotterdam Study. Ophthalmology. 1994;101:1851–5.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Coffey M, Reidy A, Wormald R, Xian WX, Wright L, Courtney P. Prevalence of glaucoma in the west of Ireland. Br J Ophthalmol. 1993;77:17–21.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar 

  • Klein R, Klein BE, Moss SE, Wang Q. Hypertension and retinopathy, arteriolar narrowing, and arteriovenous nicking in a population. Arch Ophthalmol (Chic, Ill: 1960). 1994;112:92–98.

    Article 
    CAS 

    Google Scholar 

  • Frank RN. Diabetic retinopathy. N Engl J Med. 2004;350:48–58.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Bertelsen G, Peto T, Lindekleiv H, Schirmer H, Solbu MD, Toft I, et al. Tromsø eye study: prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy. Acta Ophthalmologica. 2013;91:716–21.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Gunnlaugsdottir E, Halldorsdottir S, Klein R, Eiriksdottir G, Klein BE, Benediktsson R, et al. Retinopathy in old persons with and without diabetes mellitus: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility–Reykjavik Study (AGES-R). Diabetologia. 2012;55:671–80.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Lamparter J, Raum P, Pfeiffer N, Peto T, Höhn R, Elflein H, et al. Prevalence and associations of diabetic retinopathy in a large cohort of prediabetic subjects: the Gutenberg Health Study. J Diabetes Complications. 2014;28:482–7.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Hubbard LD, Brothers RJ, King WN, Clegg LX, Klein R, Cooper LS, et al. Methods for evaluation of retinal microvascular abnormalities associated with hypertension/sclerosis in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Ophthalmology. 1999;106:2269–80.

    Article 
    CAS 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Vujosevic S, Benetti E, Massignan F, Pilotto E, Varano M, Cavarzeran F, et al. Screening for diabetic retinopathy: 1 and 3 nonmydriatic 45-degree digital fundus photographs vs 7 standard early treatment diabetic retinopathy study fields. Am J Ophthalmol. 2009;148:111–8.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Poplin R, Varadarajan AV, Blumer K, Liu Y, McConnell MV, Corrado GS, et al. Prediction of cardiovascular risk factors from retinal fundus photographs via deep learning. Nat Biomed Eng. 2018;2:158–64.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Rim TH, Lee G, Kim Y, Tham Y-C, Lee CJ, Baik SJ, et al. Prediction of systemic biomarkers from retinal photographs: development and validation of deep-learning algorithms. Lancet Digital Health. 2020;2:e526–e536.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 

  • Krause J, Gulshan V, Rahimy E, Karth P, Widner K, Corrado GS, et al. Grader variability and the importance of reference standards for evaluating machine learning models for diabetic retinopathy. Ophthalmology. 2018;125:1264–72.

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar 



  • Source link

    Dreamy Lake Powell/Glen Canyon Dreamscape – David Lane Astrophotography


    Once upon a viewpoint dreamy. As Jimmy and I crested the hill that led to this Lake Powell overlook I was on the handsfree phone discussing some matter of import. I explained that I was driving up to the edge of a cliff. As the landscape in this image popped into view before me. I gasped and let out a cry, “Oh My Gawd! Holy Sh#t!!” Convinced I was about to fall to my death the reply “Should I call 911?” was answered with “No, OMG what a view!” It was hard to parse and describe in the English language. It was as if some watery Martain scene had just popped into existence. 

    Check out the video below of this very spot at Glen Canyon/Lake Powell remembering that one it was very windy and two the sun was very bright and washes out the color in the video. In person, the coloration of this image is very close to what you would see at dusk. What I couldn’t see at the time was that Page Arizona just a few Miles to the Southwest was going to cast a ton of light pollution on the crags below me. Even at night as I sat there it wasn’t apparent that there was any light at all on the rock faces below me. 

    The camera told a completely different story, however. Even with an in-camera light pollution filter that is very effective, the cliff faces shown with a neon yellow. I loved the photo in camera but I wasn’t certain I could deal with that level of intense light pollution. I managed to get it almost completely under control eventually, as a matter of fact, I added a bit back as it gave a very interesting bit of contrast.

    If you look carefully, you can see little dots of light on the lake. These are not stars as the wind was still slightly breezy but the flashing lights of very distant boats. Apart from the stars, it was the only light you could perceive with your eyes. Distant disembodied blinking in what otherwise looked like a slightly luminescent outline of a lake.

    I think I’m finally starting to get what I want with my images. I feel like I’m getting a handle on how to make images I’m proud to present to people as art. Art that shows a detailed scene and yet challenges the senses. I hope you will enjoy my evolution and journey to produce an ever better image to share with you, my friends. Clear skies and dark nights to us all. 

     

    EXIF 80 images stitched 8×10 ISO 8000 f1.4 85mm (double panorama shot together.)

     

    ***WARNING LOTS OF WIND NOISE***





    Source link

    Vil Muhametshin – 360Cities Blog


    Vil has been creating multimedia virtual tours and 360° panoramas since 2003. He is a professional of  high definition (HDR) spherical 360-degree panoramic images; loves to create  ground, elevated and aerial panoramas; eager to find creative solutions for specific cases such as theatrical and art projects, historic reenactments or museums; builds interactive virtual tours based on aerial and ground panoramas and enhanced tours with bird’s-eye view photography and video.

    So far Vil  was mainly working in Europe – he lives in Riga, Latvia – and has traveled around Europe – France, Italy, Sweden, Spain… but he is always looking for new horizons and co-operation possibilities.

    Discover some of his 360º masterpieces below and more on Vil’s profile page.



    Source link

    Story Behind The Image “Supervised Play” – Barger Nature Photography


    A sequence of images of young polar bear cubs playing on the tundra in Wapusk National Park, Manitoba, Canada while their mother watches intently.

    These images of a mother polar bear with her two cubs playfully sparring while she watched intently, were captured this past winter in Wapusk National Park, Manitoba, Canada. I spent the first two weeks of March this year in the Canadian tundra with a small group of photographers. Our primary goal: photograph these awesome mammals in their natural environment. The cubs in these images are only a few months old, so they are extremely small in size.

    Local guides are required to enter the Park. Travel is done using vehicles modified to negotiate the rough tundra terrain. Travel in these vehicles is very slow and bumpy, Typical speeds for these vehicles would max out at 10 miles per hour.

    Early in the morning on my first full day in the Park, two of our guides spotted a polar bear family sleeping on the tundra. After a long, slow, and bumpy ride, which took over an hour, we arrived at the site early in the afternoon to find all three bears curled in a big ball, sleeping, and covered with snow. The sound of the tundra vehicles as they approach does not alarm them, since the mother is familiar with the sound and the cubs follow their mother’s actions.

    Proceeding in a slow and methodical manner, I set up my camera, lens, and tripod maintaining the Park Services recommended viewing distance. For the next couple of hours, I patiently waited in the cold temperatures and blowing snow as the bears slept. Periodically, there would be a hint of activity when the mother would open her eyes and raise her head to make sure all was OK. She would then lower her head, close her eyes and continue resting, always aware of her surroundings. Several times, the cubs would wake up and move a bit, always maintaining physical contact with their mother.

    Around three o’clock in the afternoon, all three finally woke-up and began to move. The cubs then proceeded to climb all over their mother pulling her fur, ears, and paws, while maintaining physical contact with her. After 30 to 40 minutes of this, the cubs then began playful sparring. At first, they would stay close to her, but after a short time began to move away but no farther than 15 to 20 feet off to her side. This is when these images were taken.

    It is always a challenge how to depict motion in a single wall print. After thinking about it for awhile, I decided to make a montage using the images from the sequence. The image featured in the center would be the mother intently watching her cubs sparring close by. This image would then set the stage for the remaining images of the cubs sparring which would be placed around the center image. The spacing between the cubs and their mother was outside the field of view of my lens so I could not include the mother in these images.

    [rl_gallery id=”513″]

    After further thought, I decided to use the images of the cubs sparring, to make a sequence. Since the action occurred quickly, I was able to pick 10 images where the background remained constant, using these images for the time lapse sequence.

    [responsive_vimeo https://vimeo.com/412780199]



    Source link

    Add your own keyboard shortcuts in PixInsight


    PixInsight has many keyboard short cuts build in right from the start (you can find an overview of them here.), some very useful while others won’t get used at all probably. One thing that bothered me though is that I can’t start processes using keyboard short cuts so I decided to look for a way around this. Luckily there is this great open source program called AutoHotkey that will let you define your own keyboard shortcuts and basically have them do anything you like. Even better; you can also program mouse buttons and movements!

    Using AutoHotkey

    You can download AutoHotkey for free here. As far as I’m aware, this only works on Windows at the moment. AutoHotkey will work with so called scripts, in which you can program the keystrokes or mouse behaviour it needs to react on and define what the program will need to do once it detected the particular keystroke(s).
    This scripting can seem a bit complicated from the start, but there is a lot of great documentation and examples available. I’ll post some example code specificaly for PixInsight further down in this post.

    Now let’s run briefly through the required steps to use AutoHotkey to add custom keyboard shortcuts to PixInsight:

    1. Download and install AutoHotkey
    2. Download AutoHotkey here and simply run the installer

    3. Add AutoHotkey to Startup
    4. It will be really convenient for AutoHotkey to always run in the background, so add it to Startup

    5. Create a script
    6. Now it’s time to start creating a script for AutoHotkey;

      1. Right-Click on your desktop.
      2. Find “New” in the menu.
      3. Click “AutoHotkey Script” inside the “New” menu.
      4. Give the script a new name. Note: It must end with a .ahk extension. Ex. MyScript.ahk
      5. Find the newly created file on your desktop and Right-Click it.
      6. Click “Edit Script”.
      7. A window should have popped up, probably Notepad.

      Now we can start editing the file to create some shortcuts for PixInsight.

    7. Special keys and their symbols
    8. First we need to be aware of the symbols we’ll need to use to define certain keys like Alt, Ctrl and Shift. AutoHotkey uses the following symbols for the keys:

      Symbol Key
      # Win (Windows key)
      ! Alt
      ^ Ctrl
      + Shift
      Use the left key of the pair. e.g.
      > Use the right key of the pair. i.e. >+a = right Shift + a

    9. Add a custom shortcut for an existing keyboard shortcut in PixInsight
    10. Let’s start really easy and simply use another keyboard shortcut to toggle the ScreenTransferFunction. The default shortcut for this is F12, which I don’t find convenient for frequent use. Let’s say we want to use Alt+S instead. We can do this with this simple line of code:
      !s::send, {F12}

    11. Save the script and run it
    12. Save the file and double click it on your desktop to run it. Now open up PixInsight and open an image on which you can test the ScreenTransferFunction Toggle. Hit Alt+S to toggle the ScreenTransferFunction!

    Now you have your first script succesfully working, let’s dive in a bit deeper and use the PixInsight Console to open up Processes

    Open up Processes with keyboard shortcuts

    Most people probably won’t know this, but the PixInsight console is more than just a monitor for processes to output to and which you can keep an eye on to see what’s going on when you execute processes. It is also a really extensive input console which you can use to do really a lot of (complicated) stuff. This is very useful in this case because it is the console we will use to fire up Processes instead of mimicking mouse movements and menu clicks which are far less reliable. Luckily there is even a keyboard short cut to open up the Console in PixInsight, so scripting a custom keyboard shortcut in AutoHotkey for PixInsight is remarkably easy!
    Basically we need to do 6 things when we want to open up a process;

    1. Define the keyboard shortcut that needs to trigger the opening of the process.
    2. Let’s open up the ScreenTransferFunction with Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S. We can do this by starting the script with ^!+s::
      Note: Please be aware of existing keyboard short cuts like Ctrl+S to save a file, and avoid using those.

    3. Open the Console
    4. We can open the console with ^!c

    5. Wait for the Console window to open
    6. We can’t start typing right away, we’ll need to wait till the window is opened. This can be done by using the sleep command and specifying the time in miliseconds that AutoHotkey needs to wait. sleep, 600 is what I use to make sure PixInsight has opened up the Console window.

    7. Type in the name of the process we want to open
    8. We can simply send keystrokes to mimick typing. To open up the interface window of a process from the console, all we have to do is add ‘–interface’ to the name of the process.

    9. Hit Enter
    10. To mimic hitting enter we can simply add; {enter}

    11. Tell AutoHotkey we are done with the actions for this particular shortcut
    12. If we use only one line of code like before, we don’t need to specify the end of the script and we can simply begin a new shortcut on a new line in the file. If we use multiple actions like we are doing now, we need to tell AutoHotkey when this collection of actions end so that we can start up a new shortcut after it.
      We do this by simply adding “Return”

    If we combine this we’ll get the following code:

    ^!+s::
    send, ^!c
    sleep, 600
    send, ScreenTransferFunction --interface {enter}
    Return

    Now save the file and right-click the AutoHotkey icon in the Taskbar and Reload the script.

    Go to PixInsight and try it out!

    Add more keyboard shortcuts in the same script file

    You can just continu adding more shortcuts by placing the code for new keyboard shortcuts after the previous ones. We’ve seen two examples already, now let’s just add a third one to open another Process interface; Windows key + S for Starmask.

    #s::
    send, ^!c
    sleep, 600
    send, StarMask --interface {enter}
    Return

    It is usefull to add comments in the script file, so you can keep track of what everything means. You can do this by starting a line with “;”.
    If we combine all three examples and add comments, our script file will look like this:


    ;ScreenTransferFunction - Toggle
    !s::send, {F12}

    ;ScreenTransferFunction – Interface
    ^!+s::
    send, ^!c
    sleep, 600
    send, ScreenTransferFunction –interface {enter}
    Return

    ;Open StarMask interface
    #s::
    send, ^!c
    sleep, 600
    send, StarMask –interface {enter}
    Return

    Limit the keyboard shortcuts to only work in PixInsight

    It is very useful to limit the keyboard shortcuts to only work in PixInsight. This enables you to use the same keyboard shortcuts again in other programs for instance.
    You can do this by simply using the #ifWinActive statement with the title of the window. So in our case we’ll be adding the following to your script: #ifWinActive PixInsight 1.8 and place the keyboard shortcuts for PI between {}
    So if we add this, now our script file looks like this:


    #ifWinActive PixInsight 1.8
    {
    ;ScreenTransferFunction - Toggle
    !s::send, {F12}

    ;ScreenTransferFunction – Interface
    ^!+s::
    send, ^!c
    sleep, 600
    send, ScreenTransferFunction –interface {enter}
    Return

    ;Open StarMask interface
    #s::
    send, ^!c
    sleep, 600
    send, StarMask –interface {enter}
    Return
    }

    Add more commands

    In addition to opening up the process windows, you can also execute them with certain settings and do a lot more using the Console in PixInsight.
    Just type in –help in addition to the process name to see all the things you can do in the Console with that particular process.
    Please let us know in the comments below if you have any good ideas for more keyboard shortcuts!




    Source link

    5 Must-Know Facebook Tips For Photographers


    Having a successful Facebook page is the highest level of digital branding.

    Why? It’s because this social media platform has the largest market share with 2.93-billion active monthly users. So, success on Facebook means great exposure and sales.

    No wonder why every professional is in a constant struggle to improve their page’s performance. You’ll find them posting daily, developing strategies, and whatnot. Some even use growth services that help get Facebook free likes and followers.

    However, growing a Facebook page isn’t that hard. Today, we’ll share some amazing must-know Facebook tips for photographers to help boost your page instantly. Let’s dive in!

    Post Consistently

    Both algorithms and people prefer Facebook pages that are active.

    When you post consistently, the viewers stay updated with the latest things going on in your photography business. This helps them feel involved and connected.

    Plus, a study suggests that when one thing pops up again and again in front of someone, it encourages them to make a purchase. So, consistent posts are an excellent way to boost sales too.

    As for algorithms, the activeness of a page triggers the bots to increase visibility. It shows the post on others’ feeds and even sends suggestion notifications.

    Optimize Your Page

    Never underestimate the power of optimizing your Facebook page. It helps increase the ranks of your page in the search results. So, when someone searches for photographers or photography, your page will pop up.

    Here are some Facebook SEO tips to follow:

    • Fill in the About Us accurately
    • Use keywords in the content
    • Claim the vanity URL
    • Get backlinks

    The keyword point is the most important. These key terms should be sprinkled naturally in your page title, about us, contact, and even the captions.

    Use Videos & Livestreams

    Perhaps, we don’t need to emphasize the need for high-quality images for your page. As a photographer, you would know that people are attracted to flawless images. But, while trying to build a portfolio, don’t forget videos and live streams.

    Research says that videos are 1200% more effective in delivering the message. They generate more likes and shares than any other content form. So, make sure you upload at least 1 to 2 videos every week.

    These videos can be anything from a recap of the last year’s work or behind-the-scenes of a current project. You can even skip the trouble of video making and editing by going live.

    Be Human

    Engagement with the audience is crucial to create a loyal community. You need to interact, socialize, and let them know that there’s a real person behind the screen.

    Post about your struggles and achievements. Make people feel comfortable and connect with them on similar grounds. They would feel more confident in doing business when they know you and them are alike.

    Also, do not overstress about publishing overpolished content. Too much perfection often gives a fake and cold feel to your business.

    Run Facebook Ads

    Facebook ads are a great marketing tool that lets the platform handle the duty to increase exposure. Of course, it’s not free, but it’s worth the money.

    All you have to do is select the post and sponsor it. Facebook will drive the results for you!


    Related Articles:



    Source link

    Art In Nature : Middle of Nowhere, Nevada


    A few weeks ago Aubrey, myself, and some friends celebrated George and Abraham’s birthday by driving out to west-central Nevada to see what we could find in and around the Toiyabe Mountains. We found some hot springs, wide open spaces, pinyon pines, junipers, burros, and many empty roads. It was a lovely break from the busy life of a young professor! I look forward to returning to the area in the spring, when there may be some flowers out and about.

    The blue thing is our new replacement of our red cube: an ice fishing hut! It served us well as a portable living room.

    Late afternoon sunlight dances across the basin and range of Nevada. Pictured here is the western side of the Toiyabe Mountains, with some Juniper and Pinyon Pine in the foreground.

    Pinyon Jays perched atop a pinyon pine in Nevada’s Toiyabe National Forest.

    Wild Burrows pose in front of the eastern Toiyabe Range in Nevada.

    Tags: nevada, toiyabe mountains, toiyabes



    Source link